The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘journalism’

Students get career advice at Mississippi Association of Broadcasters Day

Posted on: March 7th, 2017 by ldrucker

University of Mississippi student Torry Rees speaks with radio broadcaster Jeff Covington during the event.

When Abbie McIntosh was in 8th grade, her mother demanded that she finish her homework before watching her favorite football team play.

“I was a huge Texas fan,” said the Houston native. “I had to finish my homework before I could watch Texas. And that night at dinner, my mom was like, with how much you love sports, I think you should look into being a sports broadcaster.

“I thought about it, did some more research, and I really liked it. I did print (journalism) in high school, because we didn’t really have anything broadcast, but I wanted to do broadcast.”

Today, the University of Mississippi sophomore is preparing for a future in broadcast journalism. She attended Mississippi Association of Broadcasters Day at the Meek School of Journalism and New Media Tuesday in the Farley Hall on the University of Mississippi campus to have her resume critiqued and seek career advice from industry professionals.

McIntosh said she has learned a lot about broadcast journalism at the Meek School.

“I’ve just learned different techniques,” she said, “like how to do the proper standup.”

McIntosh said she’s also learned how to create a broadcast package, how to shoot B-roll, proper interview techniques, and how to use cameras and equipment.

“I’ve learned so much in my two very short years here,” she said. “I just wanted to get feedback on my work to improve myself.”

UM senior Lynecia Christion, 22, is also studying journalism.

“I’m basically just trying to get some advice and criticism,” she said Tuesday. “I brought my resume so I could tweak it a little bit. I didn’t realize how fast the year was going to go by, and now it’s really kicking in, and you go to places like this and realize graduation is about to be here.”

Christion said she’s trying to get her name and brand out to future employers.

“Right now, I’m not so big on being in front of the camera,” she said. “I like the background scene in producing, editing and directing. I am willing to report if I need to just to get to a background spot.”

Nancy McKenzie Dupont, Ph.D., organized Mississippi Association of Broadcasters Day.

“It’s everything I hoped it would be,” she said, referring to the event. “I’m always nervous before this event every year because there are so many moving parts, and everything has to come together, but the broadcasters of the state have supported our students, and many students get internships and actual jobs every year.”

A journalism or integrated marketing communications degree can lead to a job in public relations, marketing, sports promotion, creative services and many other categories.

Dupont said the event teaches students how to succeed in broadcast journalism and marketing jobs at broadcasting stations. It involved portfolio critiques in the morning, a meeting with faculty, and small group discussions in the afternoon. The public was not invited. It was only for students and faculty only. Dupont said said 15-20 broadcasters attended.

“Broadcasters want to come to the Meek School because they believe it’s the best program in the state,” she said. “They want to help students during their time here. It would be a mistake for students to miss this opportunity to get a professional critique of their work and advice on how to land the job they want.”

Dupont said many students start out with the goal of becoming newspaper and broadcast reporters, but because many jobs have changed, there are many more career options for students. Her advice: Develop as many skills as you can—writing, video shooting, editing, social media, etc.—and intern at more than one place to gain experience.

For more information about the event or the University of Mississippi Meek School of Journalism and New Media’s broadcast journalism program and and classes, contact Dupont at ndupont@olemiss.edu.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

Mississippi Association of Broadcasters Day speakers offer advice

Posted on: March 6th, 2017 by ldrucker

A journalism or integrated marketing communications degree can lead to a job in public relations, marketing, sports promotion, creative services and many other categories.

That’s why the University of Mississippi annually hosts the Mississippi Association of Broadcasters Day. It will be held Tuesday, March 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Nancy McKenzie Dupont, Ph.D., is a professor of journalism at the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media and coordinator of the event that will be held in the Overby Center in Farley Hall on the UM campus.

“This event is for students to learn how to succeed in broadcast journalism and in marketing jobs at broadcasting stations,” Dupont said. “The day consists of portfolio critiques in the morning, a meeting with faculty, and small group discussions in the afternoon. The public is not invited to any of the events. It’s just for students and faculty.”

She said 15-20 broadcasters will attend.

“Broadcasters want to come to the Meek School because they believe it’s the best program in the state,” she said. “They want to help students during their time here. It would be a mistake for students to miss this opportunity to get a professional critique of their work and advice on how to land the job they want.”

Dupont said many students start out with the goal of becoming newspaper and broadcast reporters, but so many journalism jobs have changed, and there are many more career options for students.

“I hope students will learn what skills they need to be developing right now to make themselves ready for careers at broadcasting stations,” she said.

Her advice: Develop as many skills as you can—writing, video shooting, editing, social media, etc.—and intern as much as you can to gain experience.

For more information, contact Dupont at ndupont@olemiss.edu.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

Meek School students find media mentors in Raycom execs

Posted on: April 4th, 2016 by drwenger
WLOX News Director Brad Kessie critiques the work of Breck Jones, a broadcast journalism major. Photo by Ji Hoon Heo, April 4, 2016.

WLOX News Director Brad Kessie critiques the work of Breck Jones, a broadcast journalism major. Photo by Ji Hoon Heo, April 4, 2016.

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media was proud to host eight executives from Raycom Media Inc. on Monday, April 4. Students had the opportunity to meet with the executives who reviewed their portfolios. They attended sessions focused on various media careers.

One of the nation’s largest privately-owned broadcasters, Raycom owns or provides services covering nearly 14 percent of the nation’s television households, with 62 stations in 20 states. The company employs more than 4,600 people in a variety of positions, and the executives gave students insight on the career opportunities that await them in media, as well as advice on how to break into the industry.

“It’s not just anchors and reporters like everyone thinks,” said Vicki Zimmerman, the Raycom Regional News Director, during a session on producing. “There’s opportunity everywhere–digital, production, sales, marketing, research.”

The executives encouraged students to consider a potential media employer based on the company and its values, and not just on the market size. Additionally, they gave honest advice about the workload and the pay of the news media profession.

WMC-TV News Director Tammy Phillips and WLBT News Director Hatton Weeks observe NewsWatch Ole Miss before offering a critique. Photo by Ji Hoon Heo, April 4, 2016.

WMC-TV News Director Tammy Phillips and WLBT News Director Hatton Weeks observe NewsWatch Ole Miss before offering a critique. Photo by Ji Hoon Heo, April 4, 2016.

“You need to be realistic,” said Tammy Phillips, News Director at WMC Action News 5 in Memphis. “You’re not going to start off with Tom Brokaw’s salary, and your first year is hard but will give you a lot of experience. You’ve got to be willing to work hard and care about your audience and, if you care about the work, it really is a lot of fun.”

The group advised students on careers within Raycom, noting the company is not only up-to-date on technology and offers opportunities throughout the nation, but also truly cares about its employees.

“If you have the vision, Raycom will help you achieve it,” said Zimmerman.

With the media landscape constantly evolving because of changing technologies, Brad Conaway, a regional director on the digital side, provided advice on some of those job options within Raycom that vary from the traditional.

“We’re really focused on finding out where the ideal place to engage with our audience is for every piece of news,” Conaway said. “Do we need to put this on Facebook, on Instagram, on live television, on our website?”

Conaway demonstrated the live analytics tools he uses to monitor online engagement and new mobile applications that allow journalists and producers to create news packages on the go.

In addition to the excellent advice for journalism students, the Raycom visit also opened the eyes of some students who had never considered a television career.

“The visit demonstrates that media companies also are interested in hiring professionals in marketing, public relations and advertising,” said Scott Fiene, director of the Integrated Marketing Communications program. “It reiterates the crossover between journalism and IMC that we have here. It’s a huge opportunity for our school and our students.”

Professor Deb Wenger, who organized the day’s events, says she felt it was particularly important for students to make connections with professionals who can help them grow into the careers they hope to have one day.

“These are busy people, but they are hugely generous with their time.  They’ve asked students to stay in touch and to treat them as mentors and, best of all, they actually mean it.”

Story contributed by IMC graduate student Jane Walton.

Innovation is focus of Ole Miss New Media 2015

Posted on: March 23rd, 2015 by drwenger

OMNMImageIt’s a rare business that doesn’t see the need to innovate, and the news and information industries have never needed to try new things more than they do now.

“Culture is the key word,” says Hank Price, general manager of WVTM-TV in Birmingham. “It’s very difficult to innovate; the more successful a company is at doing what they currently do, the more difficult it is for them to innovate.”

Price, who is one of the speakers at the Ole Miss New Media Conference (OMNM) on April 9 in The Overby Center Auditorium on the Oxford campus, says that companies often don’t think about innovation until it’s too late. He says media businesses have a tremendous opportunity right now.

“The door is open for anything we want to do,” Price said. “The consumer has never been more willing to accept fresh ideas. It’s a fantastic time to really look at how we can interact with the consumer in ways that are valuable and important.”

In addition to speaking at the conference, Price is one of the authors of a new book about news media management. Called “Managing Today’s Media: Audience First,” he wrote the book with Ole Miss journalism professors Deb Wenger and Samir Husni. It should be available in August of this year.

The OMNM Conference will kick off at 9:30 a.m. with remarks from Lewis D’Vorkin, Forbes Media’s chief product officer, a man responsible for the company’s digital and print platforms, including Forbes.com on desktop, mobile and tablets.

The conference will also feature USA TODAY’s Fred Anklam. Anklam is an Ole Miss graduate who will be receiving the Meek School of Journalism & New Media’s Silver Em Award. The award honors Mississippi journalists who have contributed a great deal to the profession.

Registration for the conference is now open. It costs $50 to attend and includes lunch in the Grove. Price hopes participants will come away understanding one important point.

“The fact is that you can’t innovate without failure. I don’t have any hard numbers, but I would guess looking at my own failure rate, I think it’s about 80 percent. The reality is you have to do a number of things wrong before you find your success.”