The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘integrated marketing communications’

Meek School sophomore, cancer survivor makes most of gift of life

Posted on: July 31st, 2018 by ldrucker

In 2013, Allie Allen was the 14-year-old captain of her junior high dance team when she started to feel strange every day around lunch. After the brief, but indescribable sensation passed, she would become exhausted.

She shrugged it off until a practice at Schilling Middle School in Collierville, Tennessee, when the spell hit so hard she completely stopped dancing. She saw a doctor who first thought it was anxiety, or simple exhaustion from being an active person in a growing body.

But Allen soon found out it was something far worse. She had been suffering focal seizures and was diagnosed with a golf ball-size brain tumor.

Allie Allen, a UM sophomore majoring in integrated marketing communications, has been battling a rare form of brain cancer since she was 14. She caries a full courseload and is determined not to let her diagnoses define her. Submitted photo

She faced the tough decision of having surgery or delaying the procedure to go to nationals with her dance team. She danced, but once the competition was over, she opted for surgery, an eight-hour ordeal that led to the discovery that her tumor was an extremely rare form of brain cancer found almost exclusively in toddlers. The teen was told she wouldn’t live to graduate from high school. But her story didn’t end there.

After two bouts with cancer, she’s a University of Mississippi sophomore majoring in integrated marketing communications. She had a 4.0 grade-point average her first semester and finished her freshman year with a 3.6 GPA.

“I won’t let cancer define me,” she said. “I take 126 pills each week, but I try to live life as much as I can. I just have to work twice as hard as everybody else.”

Her upbeat demeanor belies the struggle her life has been. After treatment stopped the tumor from growing in 2013, it began to grow again in 2015. On top of that, her mother, Debbi Allen, had been neglecting a concerning lump in her breast while her daughter underwent treatment. Once she saw a doctor, Debbi found out she had breast cancer that had spread to her lymph nodes.

“We both lost all of our hair,” Allie said. “We were baldies together. It was a unique experience.”

The two found themselves going through radiation treatments together after Debbi completed her chemotherapy. They moved into an apartment in downtown Memphis to be closer to hospitals for seven months while they underwent treatment.

“It was bonding,” Debbi said. “We spent every second together.”

Allie’s determination to live a normal life despite her long, difficult battle with cancer is inspiring, her mother said. She wrote about her experiences on her blog, “dancerwithcancer,” which she wanted to use as a tool to help others going through the same struggles. Her nature definitely had an effect on Debbi, who drew strength from Allie during her own health struggles.

“I’m very, very proud,” Debbi said. “I’m raising a good one.”

Debbi’s cancer is gone. Allie still has a small tumor in her brain. Her kind of cancer has a high rate of recurrence, so she has to get scans at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital about every two months.

“I’m not in remission,” Allie said. “We’re just watching my tumor and praying that it doesn’t grow because they haven’t discovered a cure for me yet.”

UM sophomore Allie Allen (left) has been battling a rare form of brain cancer since she was 14. She and her mother, Debbi Allen, both were treated for cancers at the same time in 2015. Submitted photo

It’s easy to wonder why the two wound up in the incredibly unlikely scenario of a mother and daughter having cancer at the same time. Debbi says her daughter has one theory that makes her sad.

“She says to me, ‘I heard you praying over me when I was in the hospital,” Debbi said. “I heard you asking God to take cancer from me and give it to you.’ I got my cancer a few months later.”

Despite being dealt such a tough hand, Debbi said her husband, Eric Allen, a pilot for Fed Ex, has been extremely strong and caring as his wife and daughter have gone through their treatments. She credits him and the couple’s son, Zach Allen, for being there for her and her daughter.

These days, Allie doesn’t dance anymore, not because she can’t. She’s just a busy college student with a full schedule of classes and being active with Tri Delta sorority. She also has a new passion that she learned while being treated at St. Jude.

Being bald during the awkward teen years was tough, but she found that she loved doing her makeup.

“When I was bald, makeup was something I loved,” Allie said. “It showed that I am a girl and into girly things.”

She works with a spa, doing makeup for brides and others. She finds that work extremely rewarding.

“I love making girls feel pretty,” Allie said.

She also raises money and makes appearances on behalf of St. Jude. She hopes to work full-time for the hospital one day so she can help support its mission to help children with cancer.

Though she battles side effects from medicines and treatments, Allie doesn’t do any less than a normal college student would, including handling her own laundry and chores. She has parts of the workings of her brain missing, she said, so she has to work harder than most on schoolwork.

She also lives every day with a reminder of what she’s been through in the form of a spot on the side of her head where her hair won’t grow back. Her mom gives her credit for rocking a pixie haircut that suits her, nonetheless.

The positive vibe her presence gives off doesn’t match up with what someone might expect from a person who has fought cancer twice and lives with a brain tumor.

Allie’s drive to be “normal” comes partially from a realization that many of the friends she made who also had cancer are no longer alive. She lives for them.

“I really think about that all of the time,” Allie said. “It’s called survivor’s guilt. I think about my last dance. Then, my tumor was stable and it hadn’t grown. A lot of my friends had gotten re-diagnosed with their brain cancers around then. That should have been me.”

While she works through survivor’s guilt, she also takes comfort in knowing that she has been given a gift: the opportunity to keep on living.

“They told me I wouldn’t make it to my high school graduation,” Allie said. “Statistics don’t mean anything to me, but only God knows when my time will come. No one really knows what is going to happen. I know that there is a plan for me out there.”

This story was written by Michael Newsom for Ole Miss News.

Meek School launches new IMC Online Graduate Degree Program

Posted on: July 25th, 2018 by drwenger

If you’re interested in earning a master’s degree, but don’t want to give up your day job, you can now earn a graduate degree in integrated marketing communication completely online through the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at the University of Mississippi. The first classes start in August.

This program is designed to give mid-career professionals an opportunity to learn how to use communication to connect people and organizations, without having to uproot their lives to become full-time students on a college campus. It also is opening the school’s programs to students around the world.

The master’s program in integrated marketing communication allows online students to take the same courses as residential students, with the only differences being the flexibility of delivery and the sequence of the courses.

“Demand is high for advanced study in how to integrate communication efforts to influence people’s behavior, but moving to Oxford to complete a graduate degree is difficult for people who are working full time and have other obligations,” said Robert Magee, program director and assistant professor of IMC.

Students can complete the 36-credit-hour degree program in two years by taking courses throughout the fall, spring and summer semesters.

“Because the online program is designed for people who are working full time, courses will be offered one at a time in the half-semesters and summer sessions,” Magee said. “This will enable a student to focus energy on each course and advance in a systematic way.”

The curriculum combines theory, insight and real-world application in the areas of audience research, analytics, creative production and brand strategy.

The demand for more education in the constantly changing industry of IMC is national and international, and this is the most effective way for professionals to pursue this degree, said Will Norton, UM journalism dean.

“We are developing partnerships in other nations with universities and schools that would like their graduates and students to be able to pursue our graduate degree program in integrated marketing communication,” Norton said.

Graduates are prepared for leadership roles in advertising and public relations agencies, corporations, media, nonprofit organizations, health care, political communication and sports.

The university’s IMC degree was introduced in 2012 for undergraduate and graduate studies and quickly became one of the fastest growing programs at the university. Ole Miss is one of just a few institutions to offer this type of specialized degree, and offering it online is the next step in taking it to a new level.

Faculty members hope this program will offer unique opportunities for students, no matter where they live.

“People around the world will gain access to the knowledge and skills they need to influence behavior,” Magee said.

There’s still time for students to enroll for the fall semester; the application deadline is August 10. Classes begin August 20.

UM PR students win top award from Southern PR Federation: Lantern award recognizes It Starts with (Me)ek campaign

Posted on: October 2nd, 2017 by ldrucker

A Meek School of Journalism and New Media campaign asking students to “just pause” before stereotyping others has won a top award from the Southern Public Relations Federation.

The Lantern award was presented in the internal communications category at the Southern Public Relations Federation conference in Tupelo Sept. 26. Awards are presented at three levels in multiple categories, and the Lantern is the highest level.

The winning campaign, It Starts with (Me)ek, was created and implemented by a team of 31 students led by Senior Lecturer Robin Street. Judges for the competition repeatedly praised the “great job” the team did.

ISWM was a week of speakers, programs and communications encouraging inclusion and respect while rejecting stereotypes based on race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, mental health, religion or other factors. UM alumnus Shepard Smith spoke at two of the events.

A Meek School anti-stereotyping campaign won a top honor, the Lantern award, from the Southern Public Relations Federation. Pictured here are some of the 31 Meek students who served on the campaign committee under the leadership of Senior Lecturer Robin Street, far right. Front, from left, IMC major Kaitlin Childress from Brandon and IMC graduate student Bianca Abney from Moss Point. Back, from left IMC majors Kendrick Pittman from Kosciusko and Zacchaeus McEwen from McComb, with journalism graduate student Chi Kalu from Nigeria. Photo by Stan O’Dell.

Student committee members enrolled in an integrated marketing communications course helped create the campaign. They met weekly to plan events, videos, communications, competitions and social media posts.

“Our students worked for months to plan and implement all the components of the campaign,” said Street, who taught the class. “They spent every Wednesday night in class and countless additional hours working on their individual tasks and assignments. I was so proud to see all their hard work and true dedication be recognized.”

Scott Fiene, assistant dean for curriculum and assessment and assistant professor, directs the IMC program at the Meek School. He attended the award ceremony with Street and several students.

“Our student team entered in the professional category,” Fiene said. “So they were judged, not by student criteria, but by professional standards. I noticed that they were the only students to win a professional award that night.  The award exemplifies how well all our faculty prepare our students for their careers in journalism, public relations and integrated marketing communications.”

For more information on the Meek School, visit meek.olemiss.edu.

Join the Meek School family in the Grove on three special game days

Posted on: August 29th, 2017 by ldrucker

Football games are kind of like a family reunion, and the Meek School of Journalism and New Media is part of the University of Mississippi family.

This fall, game days will offer an opportunity for Meek School students, alumni and faculty to reconnect and network during three themed events.

“We thought it would be fun to bring smaller groups of our graduates and students together so they could network, reminisce and reconnect with each other and some of their favorite professors,” said Debora Wenger, assistant dean for innovation and external partnerships, and associate professor of journalism.

The events include specific days for alumni from the Meek School’s integrated marketing communications program, the broadcast journalism program, and The Daily Mississippian and yearbook staffs. They will be held on the following dates:

Saturday, Oct. 14 – Rebels vs. Vanderbilt – IMC Alumni Day

The IMC program saw its first graduates walk across the stage in 2013. IMC Alumni Day is a chance for everyone with an IMC degree to come help celebrate the growing IMC program and alumni success.

“We hope the IMC event brings some of our alums back to campus, helps them connect with current students, and gives us a chance to highlight some of the new things happening with our program,” said Scott Fiene, assistant dean for curriculum and assessment, and assistant professor of IMC.

Saturday, Oct. 21 – Rebels vs. LSU – DM/Yearbook Alumni Day

The Daily Mississippian and The Ole Miss yearbook have been part of the university for more than 100 years. Event organizers hope to see anyone who has ever worked on these publications join others in the Grove before the game.

“Many of our recent graduates return to the Student Media Center to visit us on football weekends, but this will be the first official alumni event since we celebrated The Daily Mississippian’s 100th anniversary in 2011,” said Patricia Thompson, assistant dean for student media, and assistant professor of journalism. “We’re proud of our graduates’ accomplishments, and our current DM and The Ole Miss yearbook students look forward to networking with them.”

Saturday, Oct. 28 – Rebels vs. Arkansas – Broadcast Alumni Day

UM broadcast journalism graduates are working in TV, radio, movies and many other exciting careers. They are invited to come back to campus to talk about what they’re doing and meet and encourage other students who want to follow the same path.

“For the broadcast event, in particular, Dr. Nancy Dupont and I are hoping to catch up with some of our amazing graduates and to introduce them to current students,” Wenger said. “The plan is to have NewsWatch reporters using Facebook Live to cover the event for grads who can’t be there for the game, too.”

The events are open to everyone, including prospective students who want to stop by to inquire about the journalism and IMC programs. For more information about the programs or events, email meekschool@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7146.

Meek & Greet event encourages UM students to get involved with journalism and IMC programs

Posted on: August 24th, 2017 by ldrucker

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media hosted a Meek & Greet event from 2-4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, welcoming students to campus. The event featured music, snow cones, a Snapchat Meek & Greet geofilter, photo props, representatives from student organizations and local employers.

It was a great opportunity for students to interact with other Meek students and faculty. Those interested in majoring or minoring in journalism or integrated marketing communications could inquire about how to become involved in the Meek School’s journalism and IMC programs.

Hannah Humphreys, who is interested in the Society of Professional Journalists, said she wants to become more active on campus. “I’ve been looking for new ways to get involved,” she said.

Humphreys volunteered to run the SPJ table at the Meek & Greet event, selling T-shirts and helping register other interested students for the organization. If you’re interested in becoming involved in SPJ, email LaReeca Rucker at ldrucker@olemiss.edu.

The editors of HottyToddy.com, The Oxford Eagle and other local media members were on hand to provide information. HottyToddy.com editors Water Lyle, Steven Gagliano and Adam Brown handed out information to those who approached their table. Alex McDaniel, editor of The Oxford Eagle, was also present.

Leaders of the Student Media Center, including Lana Ferguson, editor of The Daily Mississippian, answered questions about how to work for the award-winning campus newspaper. In addition to DM representatives, in the photo above are Meek School student leaders representing The Ole Miss Yearbook (Editor-in-Chief Marisa Morrissette and Photo Editor Ariel/Cobbert) and Rebel Radio (Music Director Thomas DeMartini and News Director DeAndria Turner). NewsWatch representatives could not attend the event because the event was scheduled for a time that conflicts with newscast production of their live show, but they had materials available about auditions.

Student Amanda Hunt helped sell adorable Meek School of Journalism and New Media T-shirts featuring the name of the school and Farley Hall.

Outside, there was a Meek & Greet jam session with Dr. Jason Cain, a Meek School professor, and HottyToddy.com. There was also a pretty long line of students waiting for a snow cone, perfect for a warm day.

And students Alexis Lee, Caroline Goodwin, Natalie Reed, Katie Baique and Addy Berry posed for a photo with an Instagram photo prop.

 

Meek School of Journalism and New Media is back in action

Posted on: August 21st, 2017 by ldrucker

We’re back in action at the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, and we have a great event coming up that all students who are interested in journalism, public relations and marketing might enjoy attending.

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media will host a Meek & Greet event welcoming students to campus Thursday, Aug. 24, from 2-4 p.m. We will have music, snow cones, a Snapchat Meek & Greet geofilter, photo props, representatives from student organizations and local employers.

It is a great opportunity to interact with other Meek students and faculty. If you are interested in majoring or minoring in journalism or integrated marketing communications, this is a great time to gather information and ask faculty members how you can get involved in the journalism and IMC programs.

Harold Burson, ‘Father of Public Relations,’ Named to SPR Hall of Fame

Posted on: July 25th, 2017 by ldrucker

Harold Burson, a University of Mississippi alumnus known as the “Father of Public Relations,” was inducted Friday (July 21) into the Southern Public Relations Hall of Fame in recognition of his decades as a giant figure in the industry he helped invent.

Burson, a 1940 Ole Miss graduate who has been described by PRWeek as the 20th century’s “most influential PR figure,” founded the powerhouse public relations firm Burson-Marsteller with Bill Marsteller in 1953. The firm created the concept of total communication strategies, which became the industry standard for decades.

Will Norton, dean of UM’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media, was among those who wrote a letter supporting Burson ’s nomination to the Hall of Fame. Norton notes Burson has had a long and exceptional career and brought honor to the profession. He’s also made enormous contributions to the success of the Ole Miss journalism school.

“We have worked with Harold to initiate the integrated marketing communications degree program at Ole Miss that now attracts nearly 1,100 majors to the Meek School,” Norton said. “His sage advice in developing the curriculum and his interaction with faculty and students have been crucial for the program’s gaining recognition from the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.”

“Without the guidance of Harold Burson, the Meek School would not be what it is.”

A Memphis native, Burson was an exceptional student, so much so that he entered Ole Miss at age 15. When he was 19, he served as a combat engineer in the U.S. Army, and in 1945, he worked as a reporter for the American Forces Network and was assigned to cover the Nuremberg trials after World War II.

After leaving the military, he used a connection he had forged with an engineering firm, which became the first client of his new PR company. Later, Burson-Marsteller was born.

The PR business grew from there and for many years, Burston-Marsteller was one of only two major PR firms in the world. In 1969, Burson’s firm was making about $4.4 million a year, according to PRWeek, but by the early 1980s, revenue was about $64 million, and Burson was head of a firm with 2,500 employees in 50 offices worldwide.

In 1983, it officially became the world’s largest PR firm, with regional headquarters in New York, Sao Paulo, Hong Kong and London.

His firm handled several major accounts.  For example, it  help ed Johnson & Johnson with its response to the deaths of  eight  people who had taken Tylenol in 1982. The company was not faulted, but it assumed responsibility and took the product off the market and halted advertising.

Representatives showed complete transparency and openness and made themselves available at all times to answer questions. The  response to the Johnson & Johnson case led to Burson being credited with creating the template for crisis management.

The British government called on Burson-Marsteller ’s help  during  an epidemic of mad cow disease. He also counseled Union Carbide, the Three Mile Island nuclear plant after a famous meltdown in 1979 and BP after its Torrey Canyon oil tanker sank .

The Southern Public Relations Hall of Fame is co-sponsored by the Southern Public Relations Federation and Mississippi State University’s Department of Communications. The names of the Hall of Fame members adorn the walls in the Mitchell Memorial Library at MSU.

Inductees must have 25 years of professional experience that brings honor to the profession and show strong contributions to their organization, city, state or region, among other criteria.

Burson’s son, Mark, is an adjunct instructor in integrated marketing communication at UM. He accepted the recognition on behalf of his father, who could not attend the ceremony Friday.

Scott Fiene, director of the school’s integrated marketing communications undergraduate program, said it’s fortuitous for Ole Miss that the “father of public relations” got his start here.

“He’s counseled royalty and shaped the image of many top global brands , but he’s always remained involved and partnered with the university on so many projects,” Fiene said. “His influence on the profession isn’t just what he has accomplished, but on the lives he has touched and the students he has mentored.

“The seeds he has sown will live for generations to come.”

Rick Dean and Kristie Aylett, agency principals with The KARD Group, a PR and marketing firm based in Mississippi, also  were among those writing letters in support of Burson’s nomination .

“Kristie and I have studied and respected Harold’s contributions to our industry since we were students and, as professionals, we continue to use things learned from him,” Dean said. “To have played a role in Harold’s well-deserved nomination and induction into the Hall of Fame was our honor.”

Story by Michael Newsom

 

More than 300 graduate from Meek School of Journalism and New Media

Posted on: May 14th, 2017 by ldrucker

Saturday was a beautiful day to see more than 300 University of Mississippi Meek School of Journalism and New Media students in cap and gown congregate inside the Tad Smith Coliseum to receive diplomas during commencement exercises.

Meek School Dean Will Norton Jr., Ph.D., spoke to the audience of proud family members and graduates Saturday afternoon.

“We are delighted today to join with you in recognizing your loved ones,” he said. “332 students were eligible to participate in today’s festivities, but many completed their requirements in December, and some will complete their work in August. They may not be in the ceremony today.”

Norton also recognized Meek School faculty before introducing guest speaker J. Steve Davis, who Norton described as a “major player in the culture of the United States.”

Davis, who has worked in the world’s highest levels of marketing and advertising, has worked for powerhouse brands such as Crest toothpaste, Pampers, Dawn detergent, Scope mouthwash, Bounce fabric softener, Gillette Trac II razor blades and Tropicana premium orange juice.

“Make no mistake,” said Norton. “He is not Don Draper, one of the executives of the ‘Mad Men’ television series who worked and played at one of New York City’s most prestigious ad agencies at the beginning of the 1960s.

“Our speaker today is not (only) a great business man with great knowledge, he is a spiritual man, a man of wisdom. He grasped the great desires and needs of American people. His professional career has been exceptional. He is known worldwide as an uncommonly astute strategic marketing professional. He is revered at the highest levels of integrated marketing communications.”

Davis decided in 2002 to found and fund his own private equity consulting business in San Francisco. In the spirit of sticking his neck out, he named the company “Giraffe.”

The Nebraska native was a double major who earned a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Nebraska College of Journalism (with an emphasis in advertising studies) and the Department of Sociology.

He later became president of J. Water Thompson’s flagship Chicago office. The agency worked to brand Sears Die Hard and Craftsman products, created the Oscar Mayer Bologna and Hot Dog campaign, and the Kibbles and Bits campaign.

Steve was named Adweek’s Adperson of the year in 1995. Today, he resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

“Each of us were designed to serve, not to be served,” Davis said Saturday, as he talked about America’s selfie culture.

“Did you know there are over 2 billion Facebook users, who on average, spend over an hour a day on the site,” he said. “He or she checks her Facebook account, again on average, 47 times a day. How much of this truly connects us? How much separates us?”

Davis encouraged students to practice gratitude and set goals for their lives.

“Be uncommonly grateful,” he said. “It seems to be that, in spite of our collecting blessings and successes in this great country, we tend to be short on gratitude. I saw this time and again in my career.”

Davis believes gratitude is a habit one can cultivate instead of “some magnificently bestowed character of greatness received by a few souls.”

“Habit begins with practice,” he said, challenging the students to begin a daily exercise. “… Take out a blank piece of paper and write down 10 things that you are especially grateful for each day for a month. You’ll be amazed at just how easy it is to reach 300 things you’re grateful for in just a month. And if you aren’t sufficiently grateful now, you’ll be on the road to forming the habit of gratitude to carry through your life.”

To read more about where some of our Meek School of Journalism and New Media students are headed, check out this story.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker

Meek School students prepare for graduation and the real world

Posted on: May 11th, 2017 by ldrucker

Insecurity, worry, tranquility, acceptance, and excitement. What do all these adjectives have in common?

They are the series of emotions college seniors feel leading up to graduation.

Most college seniors are often unsure about where they will go and what exactly they will do once they’re thrown out into the real world with only a diploma to prove their worth. Over the course of their four, or maybe five years, at Ole Miss, seniors have learned who they are as people and who they want to be once they enter the professional world.

In the days leading up to graduation, seniors are getting ready to walk across the Grove stage where they have spent so much time to receive their diplomas and officially become Ole Miss alumnae.

Elise Jones.

“I can’t believe how fast it has all gone by,” said Elise Jones, an upcoming Meek School of Journalism and New Media integrated marketing communications graduate. “It seemed like yesterday that I was being dropped off at my dorm by my parents and was first feeling some type of freedom.”

Ashley Quagliaroli.

Ashley Quagliaroli, an upcoming Meek School graduate from Atlanta, Georgia, is graduating with a double major in IMC and political science. As she gets ready to leave Oxford, she has decided to take a different route than immediately entering the work force. Quagliaroli will have a gap year between graduate school so that she can gain more experience in her field before pursuing a law degree.

“I’m so excited to be able to pursue my love for journalism and also be able to pursue my other love of law,” she said. “I have always struggled deciding between the two before I realized that maybe I am just meant to do both and find the happy medium later.”

Rachel Reimers.

Another upcoming Meek School graduate, Rachel Reimers, who is graduating with a degree in journalism, will continue her education at the University of Georgia before joining the workforce. Many college seniors are choosing to continue their education after gaining their undergraduate degree, hoping to find better paying jobs or higher ranking positions in their field.

“I’m hoping that by gaining my MBA, I will become more valuable to the professional world,” Reimers said, in regard to pursuing her MBA.

Elise Jones, an upcoming Meek School graduate with an IMC degree, has decided to move to Dallas, Texas, after graduation. Jones will be working as a marketing coordinator for an insurance company.

As Elise gains real world experience in Dallas, she hopes to become an entrepreneur.

“I’m extremely excited to make the move to Dallas,” she said. “I’ve loved my time here, but I’m ready to put everything I’ve learned to real use. This is a completely new chapter in my life, but I know I’m ready.”

Murphy Butler.

Murphy Butler, an upcoming Meek School IMC senior, has also decided to join the workforce. The New Jersey native will begin an internship with a travel lacrosse program in his home state.

“I’m excited to put my degree to use and combine my two passions, sports and marketing,” Butler said. “Before I begin my internship, I am going to relax for a little while and visit with friends and family.”

As Butler gains more experience in his field, he hopes to start a travel lacrosse program and become an entrepreneur like his mother, Chris Murphy.

“I’ve grown up with my mother having her own successful business and my father finding success in the sports world,” he said. “I’m hoping to one day be able to find a way to bring these two things together for myself.”

Chloe Riley, an upcoming Meek School graduate with a degree in journalism and a specialization in public relations, has decided to move to New York to become a business analyst. Though Riley’s degree is in journalism, she has found that her career path may not always completely align with her college degree.

Chloe Riley.

“I’m so excited to work with this company,” she said, “although what I’ll be doing is not quite journalism.”

As she begins to pack her belongings and say her good-byes, Riley is starting to realize how quickly her time at Ole Miss as gone by.

“I can’t believe that I’m about to be in the real world,” she said. “Leaving Ole Miss is so scary, because so much is changing in my life right now. I’m excited, but all this change is intimidating,” Riley said about her upcoming move to New York.

As college seniors graduate and move on to their next project in life, many are left in awe by how quickly their time at Ole Miss has gone by. From spending their first Saturdays in the Grove, to staying up all night for finals, upcoming graduates look back with fond memories of their time in Oxford.

As  Riley gets closer to her move, she offers words of wisdom to fellow Meek students: “Enjoy your time here because it’s fleeting,” she said. “Talk to your professors and really get to know them. Find an internship doing something you’re passionate about, and try not to stress too much about the future, because I promise everything will turn out the way it should.”

For more information about graduation, visit the University of Mississippi Commencement web page. 

  • Story by Nancy Jackson

UM students take top awards from Public Relations Association of Mississippi

Posted on: May 10th, 2017 by ldrucker

Photo caption: University of Mississippi public relations students were the only college students in the state recognized in the Public Relations Association of Mississippi Prism student competition recently. Pictured from left to right, are seven of those student winners: (front row) Rachel Anderson, a journalism and Spanish major from Chesapeake, Virginia; Christina Triggs, a marketing and corporate relations major from Sugarland, Texas; Emma Arnold, a journalism major from McKenzie, Tennessee; Hannah Pickett, an integrated marketing communications major from Houston, Texas; (back row) Alex Hicks, an IMC major from Meridian; Sarah Cascone, a journalism major from Thomasville, Georgia; and Cassidy Nessen, an IMC major from Katy, Texas. Not pictured is journalism graduate Maggie McDaniel from Columbus, Georgia. Photo by Stan O’Dell.

University of Mississippi public relations students won every award presented in the Public Relations Association of Mississippi student competition recently, and one student was named the best public relations college student in the state.

Journalism and Spanish major Rachel Anderson from Chesapeake, Virginia, was named PRAM’s 2017 Student of the Year, competing with nominees from five other universities in the state.

“Rachel was selected for her impressive record of excellence and drive in all areas such as her academic honors, PR-related organizations and experience, and for her activities on campus and in the community,” said Kylie Boring, PRAM’s director of student services. “She has acquired a skill set of talents that will help propel her into the public relations industry, and I am confident she will represent this industry to the highest standard.”

Anderson also won an award for her student work, as did five other students and one alumna. The awards were presented at the PRAM state conference in Hattiesburg April 24.

Students entered public relations campaigns they produced in Senior Lecturer Robin Street’s advanced public relations class. Each campaign required multi-media skills, including writing news and feature articles, shooting video and photos, creating digital media, planning creative events and conducting research.

“I was so proud that every student award presented went to one of our students,” Street said. “Our students demonstrated that they excel in the diverse set of skills needed in PR. That is a tribute to the preparation they received from all the faculty members at the Meek School.”

Awards were given at three levels, based on the number of points judges award each entry. The top award is the Prism, followed by the Excellence and Merit awards. Multiple students can win in the same category if they earn the required number of points.

Hannah Pickett, an integrated marketing communications major from Houston, Texas, won a Prism.

“Students from the University of Mississippi once again proved their knowledge and understanding of the public relations practice through their entries in the Prism Awards,” said Amanda Parker, PRAM’s vice president for awards. “The judges praised Prism Award winner Hannah Pickett for having an extremely creative and well-planned project, making it an excellent campaign all around.”

Excellence winners were Anderson; Emma Arnold, a journalism major from McKenzie, Tennessee; and Christina Triggs, a marketing and corporate relations major from Sugarland, Texas.

Merit winners were Sarah Cascone, a journalism major from Thomasville, Georgia; Cassidy Nessen, an IMC major from Katy, Texas; Alex Hicks, an IMC major from Meridian; and Maggie McDaniel, a journalism graduate from Columbus, Georgia, who now works as an account manager at Communications 21 in Atlanta.

For more information on the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, visit their website at http://meek.olemiss.edu or email MeekSchool@olemiss.edu.