The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘imc’

Meek School student named Mr. Ole Miss

Posted on: September 26th, 2018 by ldrucker

A University of Mississippi integrated marketing and communications student has been named Mr. Ole Miss.

Chauncey Mullins won the honor in a recent campus election.

According to The Daily Mississippian, Mullins, a senior public policy leadership and integrated marketing communications double major from Tupelo, said the election was for everyone, but he had transfer students in mind when running.

“I knew from the moment I stepped on this campus (that) I wanted to make it a better place for transfer students,” Mullins said in the DM interview.

The DM reported that Jessica Tran, a senior biochemistry major from Hattiesburg and president of UM Active Minds, was elected Miss Ole Miss.

Click here to read the entire Daily Mississippian story.

Meek School class partners with The Meridian Star

Posted on: September 24th, 2018 by ldrucker

The majority of us operating community newspapers have built our operations to support the area businesses that are the life blood of our community. We celebrate their successes and are concerned for their setbacks.

We are constantly having conversations with business owners and managers about the best and most efficient ways to market themselves. Who within our own operations is taking the time to think about how best we market ourselves? Or more importantly, who has time to ask and answer that question?

Alexander Gould (foreground) and the campaigns class at the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. (University of Mississippi photo)

Many of us are not just operating a newspaper, we are operating a media company. Of course we have our print newspaper, but we also have a robust website, a total market coverage (TMC) paper, and in many cases, a magazine.

For many of us, we are expanding our media companies to include a suite of digital marketing services. When all our time and resources are focused on expanding our advertiser’s business, how do we move from physical newspaper to media company in our business community’s eyes?

I recently had the pleasure of traveling to Ole Miss to meet with Ann Day Becker and her campaigns class and pose that very question. Her campaigns class is the capstone course of the Meek School of Journalism and New Media’s Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) degree program.

The class has divided itself into several “ad agencies” and all of them have taken The Meridian Star on as a client. For the fall semester, Ms. Becker’s class will be focusing on developing marketing strategies for The Meridian Star, focused on the objective of improving how area businesses perceive us.

Since our question is applicable across the Mississippi Press Association, and arguably across the United States, we will be documenting the process throughout the semester. As we start this process, I don’t know if we will find the answer by the end of the semester, but I do feel confident in two things.

First, this group of young people will give us a fresh perspective we need. Second, by documenting our journey, it will lead to greater discussions and debates in more media company offices, which can be the catalyst to their future success.

This exercise is a collaboration of The Meridian Star, the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at the University of Mississippi, and the MPA Education Foundation.

Alexander Gould, the author of this column, is publisher of The Meridian Star. His email address is agould@themeridianstar.com

Meek School is proud of its two Miss America contestants

Posted on: September 8th, 2018 by ldrucker

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media faculty and students were rooting specifically for two Miss America contestants when the pageant aired Sunday, Sept. 9, in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

While Miss Mississippi Asya Branch and Miss Tennessee Christine Williamson, both who have Meek School ties, were not selected among the final 15 contestants, Meek School leaders were proud that they represented the Meek School and the University of Mississippi in the competition.

Branch, a University of Mississippi junior, is a current Meek School student. According to her pageant bio on the Miss America website, Branch said the competition empowered her to embrace her past while helping children of an incarcerated parent find their way.

“Having the backbone and financial base of our family stripped away through incarceration and arrest left me hurt, confused, scared, bullied, and withdrawn,” she said. “Through the Miss America Organization, I have been able to face my fears and insecurities brought on by my father’s imprisonment. Now, I am boldly working to help other children who find themselves in unfortunate circumstances fulfill their greatest potential and realize they have an uninhibited future.”

Williamson, 22, attended UM and the Meek School as a broadcast journalism major. While at Ole Miss, she was a news anchor for NewsWatch.

According to Williamson’s pageant bio, she is an advocate for Alzheimer’s because she has lost four family members to the disease, including her grandfather, who she helped her mother take care of for 11 years.

“I watched the lengthy demise of someone I loved, and vowed to be a catalyst for change,” she said. “As a National Ambassador for Alzheimer’s Association, I have lobbied U.S. and state congressional leaders for three years on Alzheimer’s initiatives. I have raised $25,000 for Alzheimer’s Association to help the 5.7 million Americans and their caregivers fighting America’s most expensive disease.”

Meek School leaders also helped lead a Miss America watch party sponsored by the Student Activities Association inside the Student Union ballroom. Debbie Hall, a Meek School instructional assistant professor, said the watch party was organized to give UM students a way to celebrate the Meek School’s two Miss America contestants. Refreshments and games were offered.

Hall said the Meek School’s Event Planning class conducted a fundraiser for the two contestants’ platforms prior to the pageant as a way of recognizing and honoring them.

Students, faculty and alumni were encouraged to use the hashtag:  #MeekMissAmerica Sunday night.

“I think this is just a further indication of the quality students we have in our Meek School programs,” Hall said.

New faces and new roles at the Meek School of Journalism and New Media

Posted on: September 7th, 2018 by ldrucker

There are a few new faces and new roles at the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. Dr. Chip Wade, Dr. Graham Bodie, Dr. Iveta Imre, Brad Conaway and Bobby Steele Jr. are all filling new positions.

Imre

Dr. Iveta Imre is a new assistant professor of visual storytelling. She joined the faculty in 2018. Prior to coming to the United States, Imre worked as a broadcast reporter for the Croatian Public Television (HRT).

She graduated from the University of Tennessee with a Ph.D. in communication and information, where she also produced documentaries and worked as a visual specialist. For the past 10 years, she has been teaching classes that range from television news and documentary production to multimedia reporting and social media publishing.

“I’m very excited to be here,” Imre said. “I’ve had the Meek School on my mind for a very long time, so this is my opportunity to finally be here and work with the wonderful broadcast faculty and students. I’m excited to work with the students, learning more about them and their capabilities, and working on wonderful projects.”

Imre’s research focuses on broadcast media development in former Yugoslavian countries, trust in media, and journalism education. During her academic career, she has published articles in journals, such as International Communication Gazette, Mass Communication and Society, and Visual Communication Quarterly, and has presented papers and participated in panel sessions at national and international conferences, such as the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) and International Communication Association (ICA).

Graham Bodie. Photo by Thomas Graning/Ole Miss Communications

Dr. Graham Bodie, Ph.D, is a scholar, educator and consultant. In each role, he attempts to bring attention to one fundamentally important, yet undervalued skill – listening.

Dr. Bodie is an internationally recognized expert on listening who has published more than 80 monographs, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries. His most recent project, The Sourcebook of Listening Research (Wiley-Blackwell), is a comprehensive resource that reviews and critiques current and potential approaches to measuring listening.

“Whether you are a marketing professional or journalist, your career is influenced by how well you listen,” Bodie said. “And although you can find countless references to the importance of listening, how much direct training or education do companies, schools, or communities offer – training that actually improves our ability to process information and understand various perspectives? I’d like the change that.”

Dr. Bodie’s work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (EPSCoR) and featured in the Wall Street Journal, Psychology Today, and on National Public Radio. In addition to several research awards, he was honored twice with Professor of the Year by students in the Department of Communication Studies at Louisiana State University, where he also was recognized with university-wide teaching awards.

“My research, teaching, and consulting center on how people and the organizations they represent can cultivate a Listen First Mindset, a mindset that challenges our Western tendencies to broadcast our messages without first considering our audiences,” Bodie said. “Truly attending to others is a powerful way to connect, and whether it is your friend, family member, co-worker, client, student, or customer; everyone has a fundamental need to be heard.

“Listening effectively can help you fulfill that need. I am excited by my new role in the Meek School because it allows me to reach new audiences and learn from new people. And that’s what listening is all about.”

When Bodie consults, he prefers projects that allow him to make a difference. Currently, Dr. Bodie serves as an executive advisor for the Listen First Project and vice chairperson for the Global Listening Centre.

Dr. Bodie received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in communication from Auburn University and his Ph.D. from Purdue University. In addition to LSU, he served as a visiting scholar in the School of Media and Communication at Korea University in Seoul, South Korea.

Brad Conaway earned two bachelor’s degrees from the University of North Texas, one in radio/TV/film and one in English literature, with a history minor. Following a 15+ career in television content producing, now he studies and specializes in emerging forms of digital communication, especially social media.

As a digital manager, he created a social media strategy that was named Best in Company in terms of engagement analytics. As the corporate digital content manager, Conaway led Raycom’s push to think “Digital First,” using social media.

“I’ve never taught before, so this is a new experience,” said Conaway. “It looks like a great group of people to join and get to work with. I’m teaching digital marketing and a social media producing class.”

Conaway has covered several events, from a local shooting at a courthouse, the explosion of the Space Shuttle Columbia upon re-entry in 2003, and the morning of Super Bowl 45 in 2011 that blanketed Dallas for two days caused by a super freeze resulting in injuries. He was an Emmy nominee, Best Morning Newscast-Large Market and TAPB winner, and Best Morning Newscast-Large Market winner in 2010.

Bobby D. Steele Jr. earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Mississippi and a bachelor’s degree in health services administration from Franklin University. After a graduate internship for the Division of Outreach and Continuing Education, specializing in creative content, photography and social media marketing, he became an adjunct professor for IMC.

In the fall of 2018, Steele was promoted as the branding and promotions manager for the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. He is director of operations and a board member for the nonprofit organization Delta Jewels Support Foundation, and marketing director of Cherry Blossom Way Farms in Columbus, Ohio.

Steele is a decorated veteran who served seven years in the United States Navy. He was an active member during campaigns Desert Storm, Desert Shield and Kuwait Liberation.

Chip Wade earned a Ph.D. in biomechanics from Auburn University, a Ph.D. in finance from the University of Mississippi, a master’s degree in biomechanics from the University of West Florida and a Bachelor’s of Business Administration degree in risk management and insurance from the University of Georgia.

“I’m starting the real estate promotion program,” said Wade, a new assistant professor of integrated marketing communication at the Meek School. “I’ve been at the university since 2005. I’m excited to be here. I just look forward to building the program and continuing my research.”

Meek School professor meets with Ethiopian leaders in Washington, D.C.

Posted on: September 6th, 2018 by ldrucker

Dr. Zenebe Beyene, a Meek School of Journalism and New Media instructional assistant professor and coordinator of international programs (second from left), is pictured with Dr. Oyvind Aadland, a representative of the Norwegian Foreign Ministry, and Ethiopian leaders at a meeting on nation-building in the Charles L. Overby Boardroom at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Participants were primarily from the East Coast: New York, Virginia, Maryland and D.C. with one each from Memphis, Atlanta and North Carolina. They are lawyers, IT experts, software developers, political scientists, economists, a graphic designer, theologians, etc.

The  Meek School is grateful to the Freedom Forum for making the boardroom available. The boardroom is named for Charles Overby, a graduate of Ole Miss.

Meek School students head to Atlantic City to cover Miss America pageant

Posted on: September 5th, 2018 by ldrucker

It’s one of the nation’s biggest public speaking jobs, and two contestants with Meek School of Journalism and New Media ties will be competing for the title of Miss America this week.

Three Meek School students and a professor will also be reporting live from the pageant that will air Sunday, Sept. 9, in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Read Miss Mississippi Asya Danielle Branch’s Miss America profile.

Read Miss Tennessee Christine Williamson’s Miss America profile.

Read the profiles of all Miss America 2019 contestants.

They’ll be rooting for Miss Mississippi Asya Branch, a University of Mississippi junior, who is a current Meek School student; and Miss Tennessee Christine Williamson, 22, who attended the Meek School as a broadcast journalism major. While at Ole Miss, Williamson was a news anchor for NewsWatch.

Dr. Iveta Imre, a professor of visual storytelling, is taking three students to Atlantic City to cover the event.

“The three students, Brian Barisa, Bryanna Bynum, and Sara Doan, will be working on stories about the girls for The Daily Mississippian, Newswatch, and Hotty Toddy,” Imre said.

The Meek School group left on Wednesday, and they will be staying through Saturday covering all activities leading up to the main pageant on Sunday.

“We applied for and received press passes, and we are planning to cover the preliminaries, other activities such as the Shoe Parade on Saturday, as well as create stories about road Rebs who are going to Atlantic City to support Asya,” Imre said.

Imre said she hopes the students learn from the experience.

“I am hoping that the students will experience reporting under pressure and on deadline as we will be Skyping live for Newswatch every night, as well as creating stories to meet DM’s and Newswatch’s daily deadlines,” she said. “We are trying to anticipate and prepare for the events, but many decisions will have to me made once we arrive on location.”

Imre said she hopes the students will create contacts with other journalists covering the pageant, and learn from observing.

“I think that it is phenomenal and pretty unusual, and I am happy this is happening as I am starting my first semester as a professor at Meek school,” Imre said. “No matter what happens on Sunday, I think this is already a great success for our girls.”

Meek School leaders are also helping lead a Miss America watch party sponsored by the Student Activities Association. The pageant will air at 8 p.m. CST on ABC. The watch party will be held at the same time inside the Student Union ballroom. All are invited.

Debbie Hall, a Meek School instructional assistant professor, said the watch party will give UM students a way to celebrate the Meek School’s two Miss America contestants. Refreshments and games will also be offered.

“When we first started talking about the Meek School sponsoring a watch party, it was to be sure that we honored the two Ole Miss contestants,” Hall said. “However, we did not want to compete with a campus-wide event. Therefore, we are encouraging our students and faculty to attend the SAA event.

“We are especially excited that the two contestants represent the Meek School. Miss Tennessee Christine Williams graduated in May as a broadcast journalism major. Asya Branch is a current IMC major.”

Hall said the Meek School’s Event Planning class will be conducting a fundraiser for the two contestants’ platforms as a way of recognizing and honoring them.

“Asya’s platform is Empowering Children of Incarcerated Parents,” Hall said, “and Christine’s is the Alzheimer’s Association. We will be seeking donations to split between the two platforms.”

Hall said the class will use the hashtag:  #MeekMissAmerica. Donations can be made for one platform or the other, or both platforms. Donors will be given a “Team Christine” or “Team Asya” sticker to wear.

“What are the odds?” Hall said, that two Meek School students are in the pageant. “More seriously, I think this is just a further indication of the quality students we have in our Meek School programs.”

Meek School welcomes students back to Farley Hall

Posted on: August 20th, 2018 by ldrucker

Meek School students are back in school. The halls of Farley Hall are no longer quiet and empty.

Shannon McElvain, 19, is an integrated marketing communications major. She said she’s taking an IMC writing class this semester she is excited about.

“I took the intro class last semester and some writing classes too,” she said. “We’re going to be learning a lot about what we learned last year in the intro class and incorporating writing into it in different ways. The whole focus of the class is writing and IMC.”

 

McElvain

McElvain, a sophomore, said her goal this semester is to learn as much as possible about IMC and improve her writing skills.

“I chose IMC because it’s a very broad major, and I can do a lot of different things with it,” she said. “When I’m older in a couple of years, I’ll probably figure out exactly what I want to do. Right now, I’m still in the stages of figuring that out.”

Ethel Mwedziwendira, 22, is a journalism major and political science minor who said she is excited about the capstone class she is taking this semester.

“I’m really excited about using all of the skills I’ve learned thus far, incorporating everything including digital,” she said.

Mwedziwendira

Mwedziwendira said the Journalism Innovation class is a combination of writing and photojournalism. Her goal this semester is to stay focused and find balance between school work and involvements.

“And not overworking myself,” she said.

Coleman Hobson, 21, is an IMC major. His favorite class this semester involves campaign marketing.

“It seems interesting,” he said, adding that he hopes to eventually land a job that involves music and marketing.

Hobson

Hobson said his goal this semester is to make As and Bs.

Miracle

Megan Miracle, 21, was also found in Farley. The hospitality management major said she’s taking a lodging class this semester.

“I think it just goes into the lodging industry and hotels and stuff,” she said.  “My family is in that industry, so it should be kind of interesting.”

She said she’s also excited about taking a nutrition class this semester.

IMC program sees growth on regional Tupelo and DeSoto campuses

Posted on: May 29th, 2018 by ldrucker

Once a small part of the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, and of Outreach, the Integrated Marketing Communication Program’s growth at the regional campuses has increased in the past 18 months. Word-of-mouth promotion from enthusiastic students has driven much of the growth. But active recruitment and disciplined focus has also played a role.

As of the end of May, the program has 26 students at the DeSoto and Tupelo campuses, with additional student registration expected through the summer, since regional students tend to register later than their counterparts on the Oxford campus. The program also had its first graduating class this spring with students either stepping into new jobs and starting careers or planning to attend law school or obtain a higher degree in their field.

Working with admissions officers and academic counselors at community colleges, IMC staff have worked to raise the profile of IMC as an exciting and flexible field of study. Students are attracted to the job potential and creative satisfaction that are part of the IMC major.  Thanks to new marketing materials and ongoing communication, students and their advisors are more aware of what IMC is and what it offers. Targeted recruitment meetings at the DeSoto and Tupelo campuses, supported by program leadership and current Oxford and regional students, have attracted potential new students and have been well attended and received.

Community outreach also has helped raise the program’s profile. This spring, the first regional senior class of IMC students developed marketing, branding and public relations campaigns for key community organizations in Southaven and Tupelo. They include the Southaven Park District, Southaven Chamber of Commerce, Tupelo area United Way, CREATE Foundation of Tupelo, and the Shepherd’s Hands philanthropy in Tupelo.

Students had the opportunity to present to executives and boards of directors and saw their proposals accepted and used as part of each organization’s branding and development plans. One of our graduates was hired by one of the participating organizations. Program leaders hope that these efforts will continue to generate growth and additional job and internship opportunities for students.

Leaders believe this growth is just the beginning, and there is tremendous potential for the program at both the DeSoto and Tupelo campuses.  While regional students often face different challenges from those faced by Oxford students and complete their IMC requirements in a more condensed time frame, the enthusiasm of the program’s regional students and their belief in their future are very much the same.

Meek School is proud of regional campus students

Posted on: May 2nd, 2018 by ldrucker

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media is proud of students enrolled in classes on our regional campuses.

Here is a photo of two integrated marketing communication DeSoto campus graduates at a recent ceremony.

From left, student Billy Wilson, IMC regional campus leader Pattie Overstreet-Miller, and student Jessica Huff.

Meek IMC student wins first place in annual Speaker’s Edge competition

Posted on: February 22nd, 2018 by ldrucker

After a rare snow day pre-empted the final day of the 15th annual Speaker’s Edge competition at the University of Mississippi, the School of Business Administration recently got participants back together to present awards and wrap up the event.

Nearly 100 students participated in this year’s edition of Speaker’s Edge, which was dominated in the awards by three students from the on-campus Master of Business Administration program.

In the Ethical Dilemmas category, Ferderica Cobb, one of the Meek School’s top IMC students from Canton, took first place, followed by Jonathan Dowell, of Port Gibson, in second, and Corey Price, of Birmingham, Alabama, in third. In this category, participants presented their best solutions to workplace challenges where suggestions of sexual harassment, bribery, appropriation of intellectual property, plagiarism, per diem abuse and inappropriate office behavior were presented.

MBA students Corey Price (left), Ferderica Cobb and Jonathan Dowell swept the awards at the annual UM Speaker’s Edge competition. Price took third place in the Ethical Dilemmas and Marketplace Pitch categories; Cobb grabbed first in Ethical Dilemmas and second in Marketplace Pitch, as well as the overall championship; and Dowell took second in Ethical Dilemmas and first in Marketplace Pitch. UM Photo by Stella Connell

In the Marketplace Pitch completion, Dowell came in first, followed by Cobb and then Price. These presentations were persuasive arguments regarding technology, innovation productivity, leadership and strategy. Dowell’s winning pitch advocated using battery technology to close the performance gap between renewable energy and fossil fuels.

Cobb’s stellar performance in both categories earned her the title of overall winner for the competition, which includes a $1,000 prize.

“Speaker’s Edge was a great experience – receiving feedback from the coaches, moving from room to room, presenting our speeches to judges, competing with classmates – I enjoyed the intensity of it all,” Cobb said. “The event challenged me in new ways, and I will take those skills with me into the professional world.

“Everyone’s ideas were so interesting, and I knew there were strong presentations from my classmates. I did not expect to win. I was humbled, and it is a huge honor to be the 2018 winner.”

Cobb’s success may be attributed, in part, to the active role she played in the university’s Student Media Center.  She was very involved in Rebel Radio during her undergraduate career.

This year’s edition of Speaker’s Edge kicked off Jan. 11, featuring 97 students from the UM School of Business Administration and Patterson School of Accountancy. More than 50 judges from all over the Mid-South volunteered their time to help at the event.

“Speaker’s Edge provides students an opportunity to develop the communication and presentation skills that are vital to success in business and other leadership settings,” said Walter Davis, faculty adviser to the MBA program. “Students often point to the Speaker’s Edge experience as a highlight of their MBA or Master of Accountancy program at Ole Miss.”

Plans called for a new Team Pitch category at this year’s event, but snow and ice across much of north Mississippi forced the cancellation of the final day of competition, including the Team Pitch presentations.

“It is disappointing that Mother Nature prevented us from the opportunity to review these presentations, but this something to look forward to in next year’s competition,” said Ashley McGee, director of the MBA program.

The Speaker’s Edge competition was started by Ole Miss alumni in 2003. The event brings together industry professionals, retirees, working alumni and students, requiring students to adapt their message to different audiences.

In preparation, participants spent a week-and-a-half working with volunteer communication coaches to discover the strengths and weaknesses of their own personal presentation style in front of multiple judges.

“One great thing about Speaker’s Edge: When you see a student move through fear and become the confident speaker they will be for the rest of their lives,” said Joan Andrews, a Speaker’s Edge coach from the College of East Texas.

The annual event helps students find their own voice and grow more confident in their presentations, said JoAnn Edwards, speech instructor, director of forensics and special projects manager at the UM Lott Leadership Institute.

“The outcomes are beyond valuable – they are vital,” Edwards said. “The act of teaching, guiding and coaching that process is, for me and for all the coaches and judges who give of their time and talents, pure joy.”

The Speaker’s Edge competition is a critical program that helps Ole Miss students position themselves for success as they move into the professional world, said Ken Cyree, dean of the School of Business Administration.

“The competitive nature of the program allows our best student presenters and speakers to get even better while honing the skills of those students who are less confident in this environment,” Cyree said. “We greatly appreciate the dedicated coaches, instructors and judges who are involved in making this an exceptional opportunity for our students.”

By Stella Connell