The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Posts Tagged ‘featured’

Meek School students win top awards at regional Society of Professional Journalists conference

Posted on: April 4th, 2017 by ldrucker

From left, Lana Ferguson and Clara Turnage.

University of Mississippi students brought home six first-place wins and 14 awards total in the Society of Professional Journalists Region 12 Mark of Excellence annual awards contest.

The Daily Mississippian won first place for best daily newspaper, and NewsWatch Ole Miss won first place for best television newscast.

Clara Turnage, Daily Mississippian editor-in-chief, won two first-place writing awards. Ariel Cobbert, DM photo editor, won a first-place photography award. NewsWatch’s Payton Green and Lauren Layton teamed up to win first place for television breaking news.

Ole Miss, which competes in categories against other large colleges, won more awards than any other university in the Region 12 competition.

“I cannot remember Ole Miss students doing better than they did in this year’s contest,” said Will Norton, dean of the Meek School of Journalism & New Media. “It is an amazing statement about the kind of work the Student Media Center has distributed this year. The M
eek School congratulates students who were honored and expresses our gratitude and respect to those faculty who worked with them. We are proud of each of you.”

Region 12 includes universities in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee. SPJ selects one winner and two finalists in each category. The awards – for work published, broadcast or posted in 2016 – were announced at the regional conference on April 1 in Knoxville, Tennessee. First-place winners move on to compete against the first-place winners in the other 11 regions for national awards. National winners and finalists are expected to be announced in late spring, and honored at the SPJ national convention in September in Anaheim, California.

In the best newspaper category, entries must include three issues. The Daily Mississippian’s winning entries were April 21, October 27 and November 17.

DM Editor-in-Chief Clara Turnage not only led her staff to the best newspaper awards, but also won first place for general news reporting for “Confronting the Trust Deficit,” an article published in spring 2016 examining the university’s relationship with the IHL board, and first place for feature writing for “They Never Stopped Searching,” an article published during her summer 2016 internship at the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock. Turnage also won a finalist award in feature writing for “A beautiful multitude: The ordination of Reverend Gail Stratton” published in the DM in fall 2016.

In the best television category, one newscast is entered. The winning show for NewsWatch was broadcast on April 18, when Payton Green was manager. Green also teamed with Lauren Layton for the first-place TV breaking news award for a package headlined “ASB Resolution,” and he was a finalist for online feature reporting for “Coming Out in the Christian South.”

DM Photography editor Ariel Cobbert won the breaking news photography competition with a photo from the “Occupy the Ole Miss Lyceum” protest in fall 2016.

Other finalist awards went to:

theDMonline.com, best affiliated website.

Daily Mississippian staff, online news reporting, “Ole Miss Lyceum Protest.”
Lana Ferguson, non-fiction magazine article, “Taking Care of Their Own,” from the Mississippi Miracle depth report.

The Mississippi Miracle depth report publication, student magazine.
Brian Scott Rippee, sports column writing, “Kelly leaves a legacy as one of the best.”
Jake Thrasher, editorial cartoons.

“What a spectacular year for our student journalists,” said Patricia Thompson, Meek School assistant dean for student media. “Our students have been honored so often in the past few weeks, it has been hard to keep track. The awards covered a wide range of content – news, features, sports, visuals, television, radio, multimedia. Students work many hours each to week to provide information for the campus and community, and they are getting great experience that has helped them land great jobs and internships.”

New Course: Meek School students can learn about 3D media in May Intersession course IMC 349: Modeling and Augmented Reality

Posted on: April 3rd, 2017 by ldrucker

If you’re a journalism, marketing or graphic arts student interested in learning more about creating three-dimensional media, the Meek School of Journalism and New Media is offering the May Intersession course IMC 349: Modeling and Augmented Reality.

Students will learn unique skills that employers want. They will understand the function of 3D tools, and they’ll learn how to apply those tools to the creation of 3D models.

“There is no code,” said professor Darren Sanefski, who will be teaching the course. “Using (Maxon) Cinema 4D, you take multiple geometric shapes and mold them into recognizable objects. We add animation and integrate them into an augmented reality.

“If you’ve ever watched ESPN GameDay, you can see 3D team logos on the stage with the guys behind the desk. Those logos are created with Cinema 4D. This software is industry standard in journalism, marketing and film.”

There’s a difference in virtual reality and augmented reality.

Virtual reality uses a simulated environment. An example of this would the game Second Life that enables users to enter a computer-generated world or experience the real world, such as hang-gliding over the Grand Canyon.

Augmented reality is different. It overlays digital information on top of an existing environment. An example would be the Pokeman Go game that seemingly enables users to interact with three-dimensional Pokemon Go characters in the real world through an app.

It’s also used in logo creation.

Maxon Cinema 4D software is described as “the perfect package for all 3D artists who want to achieve breathtaking results fast and hassle-free.”

They’ll also learn how to apply textures, lighting and effects to a 3D object. They’ll select the appropriate renderer, and render a 3D model. Students will create animation of a digitally modeled item, and they will insert the animation of a 3D Model into an augmented reality.

Students taking this class will receive a free 18 month Maxon Cinema 4D license.

The course can count toward a 300 level studio credit.

To view a video of student work, visit https://vimeo.com/108118371

Here’s a link to the software site: https://www.maxon.net/en/ 

To see the Taj Mahal above in motion, follow these instructions:

To see the Taj Mahal in motion
Download Aurasma App
Search #imc349
Tap right arrow
Follow DSANEFSKI
 Scan Taj Mahal image with Aurasma App
– Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

New Course: Former UM student will teach students the psychology of sales in May

Posted on: March 30th, 2017 by ldrucker

Selling things involves psychology.

How do you get people to buy your product?

Why would they want to buy what you’re selling?

Those are two of the problems a new course offered by the Meek School of Journalism and New Media’s Integrated Marketing Communications Department will address in May.

IMC 362 Introduction to Sales will be taught by special guest Joe George, who has worked with Frank N. Magid Associates, Inc., a global media consulting firm.

George said he wants students to learn “that sales is an admirable profession, and that selling is a part of our everyday lives. Also, I want them to learn that no one wants to be ‘sold’ anything. But everyone loves to buy. What they buy is what the course is all about.”

George, according to his Facebook page, attended North Panola High School (in Mississippi) and the University of Mississippi. In the past, he was a lecturer at the Tippie School of Business at University of Iowa. 

“He taught during intersession a few years ago to rave reviews, and is coming back to Oxford in May to do it again,” said Scott Fiene, program director and assistant professor of integrated marketing communications.

Fiene said the course will cover the selling process.

“It will focus on identifying the real problems in a sales situation and review how to bring the right skills to bear on those problems at the right time,” he said. “It will cover the ‘how to’ and the ‘why to,’ and is based on information generated by the behavioral sciences.

“In other words, it looks at why people do the things they do, and how to use this knowledge to your advantage when placed in a selling situation.”

George once worked with Frank N. Magid Associates, a leading research-based strategic consulting firm that helps clients become profitable by solving problems and helping them take advantage of opportunities.

According to the company website, Magid strives to bring unique frameworks for solving problems and seizing opportunities to each engagement.

“We are unique because, for 53 years, we have carefully studied human behavior and how communication affects it,” the website reads. “We possess an uncanny understanding of what and how marketing and communication will motivate people to behave in certain ways. This understanding provides us with a unique consumer lens through which we approach each engagement.”

Magid leaders say they use their “expertise to help clients develop and market products and services and make investment decisions that align with consumer attitudes and expected behaviors.”

The company has offices in Minnesota, New York, Iowa, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Dallas.

George once worked as a lecturer at the Tippie College of Business at The University of Iowa. Tippie has 3,000 students and six academic departments, including accounting, economics, finance, marketing, management and organizations and management sciences. They have 48,000 alumni and are growing.

The Tippie College of Business was established eight years after the University of Iowa in 1847, according to the school website. The first “business” course offered there was Moral Philosophy, which examined the political economy, a subject that evolved to later include modern economics, finance, and commerce.

For more information about the IMC 362 Introduction to Sales course or other courses offered by the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, contact Fiene at safiene@olemiss.edu and visit the Meek School website at http://meek.olemiss.edu for more information about our programs.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

New Course: ‘Documentary and Social Issues’ offered at Meek School of Journalism and New Media

Posted on: March 29th, 2017 by ldrucker

One the areas that the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media takes pride in is its history of race, civil rights and social justice reporting.

Meek School professor Joe Atkins will be offering a new journalism course in the fall called “Documentary and Social Issues.” J580 will be offered Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 10:50 p.m. as a graduate elective course, but undergraduates in their junior and senior year are welcome to register for the course.

Atkins said the course “will look at the history of documentary making and its impact on major social issues of the day.”

“From Robert Flaherty’s “Nanook of the North” in 1922 and Leni Riefenstahl’s “Triumph of the Will” in 1935, to Michael Moore’s films today, the documentary has brought important issues to the public’s attention and produced intense controversy,” Atkins said. “This course explores its central role in our media world past, present and future.”

Atkins said the course looks at the role – in print, broadcast, film or social media – the documentary has played in exploring and bringing light to key social problems and issues. Students will gain fuller insight into the role journalism and documentary film can play in the discussion and possible resolution of social problems and issues.

The course will improve their ability to think critically about journalism and documentary film and to write analytically, persuasively, and comparatively about film and related texts. Some of the films that may be shown in the course include:

“Nanook of the North,” by Robert Flaherty, 1922

“Triumph of the Will,” by Leni Riefenstahl, 1935

“Inside Nazi Germany,” by Jack Glenn, 1938

“Harlan County USA,” by Barbara Kopple, 1976, about coal miners.

“The Uprising of ’34,” by Stoney, Helfand and Rostock, 1995, about the bloody suppression of striking textile workers in South Carolina.

“I Am A Man,” by Jonathan Epstein, 2008, about the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis.

A yet-to-be-determined film by Michael Moore.

Atkins has taught at the University of Mississippi since 1990. He teaches courses in advanced reporting, international journalism, ethics and social issues, media history, and labor and media.

He is the author of Covering for the Bosses: Labor and the Southern Press, published by The University of Press of Mississippi in 2008, and editor/contributing author of The Mission: Journalism, Ethics and the World, published by Iowa State University Press in 2002.

He organized an international “Conference on Labor and the Southern Press” at Ole Miss in October of 2003. A statewide columnist and 35-year veteran journalist, Atkins was a congressional correspondent with Gannett News Service’s Washington, D.C., bureau for five years.

He previously worked with newspapers in North Carolina and Mississippi. His articles have appeared in publications, such as USA Today, Baltimore Sun, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Progressive Populist, Southern Exposure, Quill and the Oxford American. Atkins is also author of the novel “Casey’s Last Chance,” published by Sartoris Literary Group in 2005.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

Meek School wins big at Louisiana-Mississippi Associated Press Competition

Posted on: March 27th, 2017 by ldrucker

The University of Mississippi won big at the Louisiana-Mississippi Associated Press Competition.

Patricia Thompson, assistant dean of Student Media at the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media, and assistant professor of journalism, said the Meek School had a great showing at the recent awards banquet in Jackson. UM students won a total of 25 awards, including 13 first-place awards and two “Best of Show” awards.

Here are the highlights, along with some of the judges’ comments for first-place winners:

The Daily Mississippian won first place for newspaper general excellence. Judges said of the DM’s three newspapers entered for this category: “This defines general excellence. Great content, strong design throughout. Excellent investigative piece, as well as a fun festival guide. Great job!”

The Daily Mississippian won first place for best website, and first place for breaking/spot news, for its coverage of “Occupy Lyceum.” Judges said the website is “clean, easy to navigate, plenty of quality content, clear winner.” Judges said of the breaking news protest entry: “Multi-media elements, including photos, video and embedded social media posts were used to effectively convey how this story quickly developed. The reporting was thorough, well-sourced and balanced.”

NewsWatch Ole Miss won first place for sportscast or news program for its show previewing the football game against Alabama.  “Pretty impressive presentation for a collegiate entry,” judges said.

The documentary class production about the election won first place for documentary TV. Judges said: “A good mix of interviews. The multiple angles were well presented.”

Clara Turnage not only led the DM staff to several first-place awards, but also won two individual first-place awards, and a Best of Show top award for newspapers. Judges said her entry that won first-place in the enterprise/investigative category, “Confronting the Trust Deficit,” which examined the relationship between Ole Miss and the IHL board, was “a clear winner. Heads above all the rest in terms of depth and sophistication.” Her feature entry was described as “understated but emotionally powerful. Good topspin to move the story along. Tight but revealing bites. Strong, evocative verbs.”

Rebel Radio correspondent Billy Rainey took Best of Show top award for radio, and won one first-place, one second-place, and one third-place award. Judges said his first-place news entry is “a terrific example of taking such a sensitive topic as sexual assault and making it vital for a college campus.”

Other first-place winners: Cameron Brooks; Brian Scott Rippee; Jake Thrasher; Italiana Anderson; Sara McAlister.

Here’s the list of everything Meek School/SMC students won:

Best of Show, newspapers: Clara Turnage
Best of Show, radio: Billy Rainey
First place, College General Excellence: The Daily Mississippian
First place, College Web site: Daily Mississippian staff
First place, College Breaking/Spot News: The Daily Mississippian staff, “Ole Miss student’s viral comment leads to community protest”
First place, College Sportscast or Sports Program: NewsWatch Ole Miss, “Ole Miss Beat Bama”
First place, College Documentary: Meek School documentary class, “Election”
First place, College Radio Documentary: Italiana Andereson, Rebel Radio, “UM breast cancer research”
First place, College Enterprise/Investigative: Clara Turnage, The Daily Missisissippian, “Confronting the Trust Deficit”
First place, College Feature: Clara Turnage, The Daily Mississippian, “A beautiful multitude: The ordination of Reverend Gail Stratton”
First place,  College Sports Enterprise/Feature: Brian Scott Rippee, The Daily Mississippian, “Ole Miss basketball: A team that spreads across the map”
First place, College Personal Columns: Jake Thrasher, The Daily Mississippian, “You are no less of a man for having been assaulted”
First place, College Sports Photos: Cameron Brooks, The Daily Mississippian, “Rebels dominate Sugar Bowl in the Big Easy”

First place, College Radio News Story: Billy Rainey, Rebel Radio, “Rebels Against Sexual Assault”
First place, College Radio Sports Story: Sara McAlister, Rebel Radio, “Ole Miss vs. Georgia”
Second place, College Newscast: NewsWatch Ole Miss

Second place, College Feature Photos: Ariel Cobbert, The Daily Mississippian, “Tory Lanez performs at the Lyric”
Second place, College Radio Feature Story: Billy Rainey, Rebel Radio, “Baton Rouge flooding efforts”
Second place, College Radio News Story: Italiana Anderson, Rebel Radio, “New vice chancellor of diversity”
Second place, College Radio Sports Story: Riley Mueller, Rebel Radio, “Rebels keep their heads up”
Third place, College Newscast: NewsWatch Ole Miss, “9/26/2016”

Third place: College TV News Story: Chandler Morgan and Payton Green, “Racial Unity Awareness Week”
Third place, College Radio News Story: Billy Rainey, Rebel Radio, “Chancellor’s investiture”
Third place, College Radio Sports Story: Megan Peoples, Rebel Radio, “Baseball spring training”
Third place, College Radio Feature story: DeAndria Turner, Rebel Radio, “Everybody’s Formal”

There were 36 college categories and nearly 300 entries from 10 colleges. There were 96 awards were handed out. Nine universities won awards in college newspaper categories; five universities won awards in the college television categories; and three universities won awards in the college radio categories. First-place winners were awarded plaques, and the six Best of Show winners each received $250 scholarships. Second- and third-place winners received certificates.

This is the first year the Louisiana-Mississippi AP Media Editors and the Mississippi AP Broadcasters have conducted a joint college contest for both states, and also welcomed Louisiana broadcast students to compete for the first time. LSU’s Tiger TV won best TV newscast, and Southeastern Louisiana won best radio newscast.

Assistant Dean Patricia Thompson attended the awards luncheon at the Hilton Jackson on Saturday, April 25, with six students: Madison Heil, NewsWatch Ole Miss manager; Lauren Layton, NewsWatch anchor/correspondent and a member of the documentary project class; Abby McIntosh, NewsWatch video producer, co-sports director and NewsWatch manager for 2017-2018; Billy Rainey, Rebel Radio news correspondent; Jake Thrasher, DM editorial cartoonist; Clara Turnage, DM editor-in-chief.

We will soon find out how we did in the annual regional SPJ Mark of Excellence contest, competing against colleges in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana.

To read more, here’s The Daily Mississippian story about the winners.

It Starts With MEek week of events set for April 19-25

Posted on: March 27th, 2017 by ldrucker

Just pause. That’s what we’re asking you to do for five days.

Pause before you assume you know everything about someone based solely on one factor, such as race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, disability, mental illness, age, etc.

Welcome to It Starts With MEek, five days of events from Wednesday, April 19 to Tuesday, April 25 designed to remind students that one factor does not define who we are.

“For example, women once were stereotyped as only being qualified for secretarial, teaching or nursing jobs,” said Robin Street, University of Mississippi Meek School of Journalism and New Media, senior lecturer and It Starts With MEek chair. “Once we quit stereotyping women, look at how much has changed.

“Even Mississippians are often stereotyped by people from other areas of the country, and look at how many outstanding Mississippians we have.”

Street said we often fall into an easy trap of stereotyping people based on their outward presentation without bothering to discover the many things we share in common with that person.

“Please join us as we all seek to understand together how to approach each person with understanding, dignity, respect and inclusion. We all have more in common than you know.”

There’s also a journalism and marketing competition happening with an April 7 deadline. You can read more here.

Here’s a lineup of speakers and events for the week:

Wednesday, April 19
“It” Starts today!

10 a.m. Opening Ceremony

Welcome from Robin Street, senior lecturer in IMC.  Introduction of committee. Announcement of competition winners. Debut of video.

Welcome and remarks from:

Charlie Mitchell, Ph.D., associate dean and professor of journalism, Meek School of Journalism and New Media

Don Cole, Ph.D., assistant provost and associate professor of mathematics

Shawnboda Mead, director, Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Recognize: Katrina Caldwell, Ph.D.,vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement       

11 a.m Other Moments: A Class Photography Exercise in Honoring Difference at Ole Miss Mark Dolan, Ph.D., associate professor of journalism and new media, and his students.

1 p.m. Making a Difference by Engaging With Difference Jennifer Stallman, Ph.D., instructor and academic director of racial reconciliation, William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation.

2 p.m.  Tell Me a Story: Mastering the Primary Building Blocks of Diversity and Inclusion Katrina Caldwell, Ph.D., vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement.


Thursday, April 20
A Day in My Life

The joys and challenges of the lives of students and faculty members in diverse publics at UM

Throwback Thursday: Faculty members will be posting throwback photos of themselves.

9:30 a.m.  From James Meredith to Millennials: Race Relations at Ole Miss

A panel of UM students discuss at the state of race relations on campus and their hopes for the future.

Moderator:  Shawnboda Mead, director, Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement. Panel members:  Bianca Abney, IMC major; Brittany Brown, broadcast journalism major; Terrius Harris, outgoing president, Black Student Union; Tysianna Marino, president, UM chapter of NAACP.

11 a.m.  Red, Blue and Rainbow: An Inside Look at Being LGBT at UM

A panel of UM students, faculty and staff members who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender discuss their life at Ole Miss.

Moderator: Rachel Anderson, journalism major and ISWM events co-chair.  Panel members: Danica McOmber, general manager, Gear Gaming; Dylan Lewis, IMC major; Mykki Newton, videographer/editor, Meek School; Susannah Sweeney-Gates, project coordinator, Center for Continuing Legal Education, with her spouse, Hayden Gates

1 p.m. Building Trust Within Professional and Personal Communities: A Workshop Dr. Jennifer Stollman, instructor and academic director of racial reconciliation, William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation.

2:30 p.m. Sometimes I Feel Invisible: The Experience of Living with a Disability

Moderator: Kathleen Wickham, Ph.D., professor of journalism. Panel members:  Stacey Reycraft, director of student disability services; Adam Brown, sports editor, Hotty Toddy.com; and students Jessie, Trenton, Timber, Martha-Grace, Josh and Jeremy.

5:30 p.m. Spoken Word performance A relaxing night of spoken word expressing stories, thoughts, and aspirations on stereotypes, respect and inclusion from members of the Ole Miss community.

Friday, April 21
Bringing it All Back Home Day
Alumni return to share their perspectives

10 a.m. Race in America: A Journalist’s Perspective, Jesse Holland, Associated Press race and ethnicity reporter

11 a.m. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. A panel of Black Meek School  alumni discuss their experiences at Ole Miss and as professionals  (This panel repeats at 1 p.m. )Moderator: Jesse Holland, Associated Press race and ethnicity reporter. Panel members: Gabe Austin, video editor, Mississippi Today; Ashley Ball, communications associate, Siemens Corporations; Poinesha Barnes, news producer, WREG; Kim Dandridge, attorney, Butler Snow; Selena Standifer, deputy public affairs director, Mississippi Department of Transportation.

Noon:  Private luncheon for panel members, committee members & faculty

1 p.m. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, Session II. A panel of Black Meek School alumni discuss their experiences at Ole Miss and as professionals.  Moderator: Rose Jackson, manager, Global Citizenship, FedEx Services. Panel members:  Gabe Austin, video editor, Mississippi Today; Ashley Ball, communications associate, Siemens Corporations; Poinesha Barnes, news producer, WREG; Kim Dandridge, attorney, Butler Snow; Jesse Holland, AP race & ethnicity reporter; Selena Standifer, deputy public affairs director, Mississippi Department of Transportation.

2 p.m. Red, Blue and Rainbow Alumni: A panel of LGBT Meek School  alumni discuss their experiences at Ole Miss and as professionals  Moderator: Shepard Smith, Fox News chief news anchor. Panelists: Martin Bartlett, PR strategist, Barracuda Public Relations; Hayes Burchfield, attorney, Burchfield Law Firm, PLLC; Kells Johnson, assignment editor, WZTV Fox 17 Nashville; Sid Williams, senior enrollment representative, SCAD.

3 p.m. My Journey from Farley Hall to Major News Events around the world Shepard Smith, Fox News chief news anchor.

4 p.m Reception for all speakers and Meek students.

Monday, April 24
Mind, Body & Spirit Monday

9 a.m.  Normal Does Not Exist, Mental Illness Does, Mary Beth Duty, licensed professional counselor and owner, Soulshine Counseling and Wellness, as well as an alumnus of the Meek School.

10 a.m. From the Bible Belt to Baghdad: what today’s IMC and Journalism professionals need to know about the world’s major religions.  Dr. Sarah Moses, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy and Religion.

11 a.m.  Keeping the Faith:  Members of the Jewish and Muslim faiths discuss their religion and the challenges they are facing in 2017. Moderator: Dr. Will Norton, dean, Meek School.  Panel members: Dr. Mahmoud A. ElSohly, research professor and professor of pharmaceutics; Dr. Richard Gershon, professor of law; Katherine Levingston, president, Hillel.

1 p.m. Mental Health and Me: Panel Discussion on Personal Experiences with Mental Health Issues  Moderator: Debbie Hall, instructor in IMC. Panel members: Lindsay Brett, doctoral student, School of Education; Mary Beth Duty, owner, Soulshine Counseling and Wellness; Justin Geller, child and youth outreach coordinator, Communicare; Hailey Heck, IMC major; Tysianna Marino, public policy major; Abby Vance, journalism major.

 2 p.m. Role of Individual and Institutional Accountability in Doing Diversity and Equity Michèle Alexandre, professor of law and Leonard B. Melvin, Jr., lecturer.

3 p.m. Keeping it Real on Social Media: Guidelines for Handling Diversity Issues, Ryan Whittington, assistant director of public relations for social media strategy.

4 p.m.  Unity in Diversity: Fashion show and entertainment. Weather permitting, fashion show will be in Farley front yard. Rain location: Overby Auditorium.

6 p.m.  Racial Politics in Memphis   Otis Sanford, former managing editor,  The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal, now holder of the Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economic and Managerial Journalism at the University of Memphis.

Tuesday, April 25
Farley Festival Day

Journalism students are asked to wear purple and Journalism faculty and staff to wear ’60s outfits today to show their support for the It Starts with (Me)ek campaign.

10:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m Farley Festival.

Join us on the front lawn of Farley Hall for entertainment, information, prizes and fun. The festival celebrates the ’60s because of the many movements that gained strength that decade, such as civil rights, gay rights and women’s rights. Rain location: Inside Farley Hall.

Students wearing purple to the tent get a free Chick-fil-A treat. Students bringing a program stamped with at least two events they attended get a free T-shirt.

 During Diversity Rocks events, if you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Paula Hurdle at phurdle@olemiss.edu.  Some accommodations, such as ASL interpreting, will require advanced notice to arrange so please request such services at least one week before an event.

Students gain broadcast journalism experience working at Rebel Radio

Posted on: March 24th, 2017 by ldrucker

Rebel Radio is a student-run organization that broadcasts throughout much of North Mississippi and enables students to gain broadcasting experience by becoming volunteer interns.

Just like any other radio station, anyone can tune in and listen to sports, music, local or world events and news.

Hernando native Aaron Isom, a University of Misissippi junior majoring in broadcast journalism, is also a former Oxford Stories reporter. He is from Hernando and attended Northwest Community College two years before transferring to UM.

FullSizeRender (1)Isom became interested in broadcasting when he was young. “I always thought broadcasters had a cool job, even when I was little,” he said.

In high school, he was a part of the student news team. “The show came on every morning, and it proved to me that broadcasting was something I was very interested in,” he said.

Isom continued his journalism career at Northwest Community College, where he worked at the local newspaper distributed throughout Tate County while attending Northwest.
He became involved in Rebel Radio because of a family connection. “My brother’s girlfriend knew the manager, so she told him about my interest in radio,” he said. “I love to talk, so radio has just kind of seemed like a good fit for my personality.”

On Mondays at 5 p.m., Isom is on the air for an hour. On Thursdays at 8 p.m., he works for two hours.

“I do enjoy working at Rebel Radio, especially on Mondays, because that is when I get to talk,” he said. “During Thursday’s broadcast, I pretty much just play music. I mostly play a wide variety of hiphop on Thursdays.”

Isom said he’s not sure a lot of people realize how far-reaching Rebel Radio is. The station even airs in the Memphis metro area.

Although one cannot see Isom’s face when he is on air, he believes working at Rebel Radio will lead to bigger broadcasting opportunities. Isom said he wants to become a broadcaster at a big sports network.

Jackson Maddox, 21, is originally from Houston, Texas. He worked at Rebel Radio last semester and  switched his major to broadcast journalism before the beginning of the fall semester of 2016. Maddox discovered Rebel Radio last summer.

51064338405__011499C3-45F6-44DE-8BED-A5DE65EF301F

Jackson Maddox. Photo by Jack Newsom.

“I am glad that I worked at Rebel Radio last semester,” he said. “It was a great experience, and I would definitely be open to being involved with Rebel Radio again.”

Maddox had two segments each week at Rebel Radio on Tuesdays and Fridays.

“On Tuesdays, I had a co-host, and we would talk about current events and pop culture,” he said. “I really wasn’t too knowledgeable about pop culture, and I don’t think she was that interested in current events, so sometimes it made for an awkward combination.”

On Thursdays, Maddox played his own music. “I really loved picking music for people to listen to,” he said.

Maddox said he didn’t have time to work at Rebel Radio this semester. “My schedule is kind of hectic this semester,” he said, “so I just didn’t want to commit to anything and then have to back out later. Even last semester, it could be hard to come to work, but that was because I worked both days at two in the afternoon, so it was sort of in the middle of the day.”

Maddox said he job was fun, and he would encourage any student to become involved.

Story by Jack Newsom, Oxford Storiesjsnewso2@go.olemiss.edu.

It Starts with MEek: Journalism Competition

Posted on: March 19th, 2017 by jheo1

Meek School students are invited to use their skills while spreading a message of acceptance, respect and inclusion for a campaign the Meek School will host in April.

The “It Starts with (Me)ek” campaign will launch April 19-25. During those days, programs will cover topics ranging from race relations and LGBT issues, to religion and mental and physical health challenges.

Prior to those days, though, students are asked to submit entries for several competitions that utilize the talents of both journalism and IMC students. Deadline for the competitions is April 7 at 8 a.m.

“The campaign’s theme asks students to just pause before assuming they understand a person based solely on that person’s race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, disability, mental illness or other factor,” said Robin Street, senior lecturer in IMC who is chairing the campaign. “One factor does not define who a person is.”

Journalism students can submit a feature story, essay, photo or video package about a person or topic related to diversity, stereotypes, inclusion and respect. The work should not be about the campaign itself. It might be about a person who has fought stereotypes, a person or organization who champions diversity, a personal experience or a lesson learned about stereotyping.

Students may enter original work in four categories: Best Print Feature Article, Best Broadcast Package Story, Best Editorial/Column/Personal Essay, and Best Photo (include an AP style caption).

Rules include: Print submissions should not exceed 1,000 words and should be submitted as an attached Word document. Photos should be sent as an attachment. Broadcast packages should not exceed two minutes. Upload videos to YouTube and send the link. Be sure your video is not marked private.

IMC students can create entries for two categories: a print advertisement and a Snapchat Geofilter. Entrants are encouraged to use the campaign theme color of purple and the existing logo, which they can obtain at https://www.itstartswithmeek.com/competition.

The ad can announce the campaign or convey the key points of the campaign.  It should be in full color and sent as a PDF or JPG file.

For the Snapchat filter, download a template from the Snapchat website.

All winners will be announced at the opening ceremony April 19 at 10 a.m. Winning entries will be on the campaign’s website and possibly displayed in Farley Hall. The winning print and broadcast stories will be submitted to The Daily Mississippian/Newswatch for possible use.  Students may be eligible for a possible prize to be determined.

The due date for all entries is April 7 at 8 a.m. Late submissions are not accepted. Send IMC submissions to Bess Nichols as an attachment at lenicho1@go.olemiss.edu. Send journalism entries to Robin Street at rbstreet@olemiss.edu. For more information, contact Street.

Download (PDF, 310KB)

 

Mississippi Scholastic Press Association State Convention set for March 31 at UM

Posted on: March 19th, 2017 by ldrucker

High school journalism students are among the smartest students in their schools. They are the creatives, intellectuals and critical thinkers. They question everything around them, and high school journalism teaches them life skills that are transferrable to any other career.

R.J. Morgan, left.

That’s why R.J. Morgan, Mississippi Scholastic Press Association director, is passionate about his job and the MSPA State Convention set for Friday, March 31, on the University of Mississippi campus.

UM will soon welcome 500-600 high school students. The convention will be held in Farley Hall with breakout sessions in Lamar, Yerby and Brevard Halls. The event will begin with breakfast and registration in the Grove from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and an opening welcome. Students will attend three breakout sessions at 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. They will break for lunch in the Grove at 12:15 p.m., and the afternoon events will begin at 1 p.m. in the Ford Center with the keynote speaker and awards program. The deadline to register is March 20.

The keynote speaker is essayist and Jackson native Kiese Laymon, who attended Millsaps College and Jackson State University before graduating from Oberlin College, a private liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. He earned a master’s degree in fine arts in fiction from Indiana University and is now a professor of English and African American studies at the University of Mississippi.

Laymon is author of the novel Long Division and a collection of essays called How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, the UK edition released in 2016. He has written essays, stories and reviews for numerous publications including Esquire, ESPN the Magazine, Colorlines, NPR, LitHub, The Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, PEN Journal, Oxford American, The Best American Series, Ebony and Guernica, according to his bio at kieselaymon.com. He has two books in the works, including a memoir called Heavy and a novel called And So On, expected in 2017 from Scribner.

“He’s a native Mississippian, who has gone on to be a highly respected and published voice,” Morgan said. “He’s so nuanced and really does a good job of articulating a point of view. That’s what I think he’s going to talk about. He was a high school journalist. When we can, we like to find people who were high school journalists.”

Morgan said the MSPA includes about 80 high school member publications. Web only is a small part. Most are newspapers, yearbooks or broadcasts. He said high school journalism teaches students how to organize their thoughts and express them clearly and concisely. It teaches them how to communicate, talk to their peers and strangers, and interview someone.

“It teaches them the importance of deadlines, the importance of design, and the way you structure things for maximum utility,” Morgan said. “High school journalism teaches them to question society, to look at things around them, and to look at what is being presented to them on the surface and critique it, whether that is their school policy on dress code or whether that is a bigger community issue.”

Oxford High School recently published a story about homelessness in Oxford. The student journalists identified and interviewed 93 members of their school district who are homeless in Oxford, Morgan said.

“Now there are groups and community organizations that are donating and trying to help those people,” he said, “and so it’s an extremely valuable learning experience that those kids take with them.

“To use education terminology, high school journalism is a really good exercise in the project-based learning theory. You give students an outlet, whether that is tomorrow’s broadcast or next week’s newspaper. You teach them the base skills that are required of that, and then you let them innovate, develop and create their own process to get from point A to point B, and that type of learning is really advanced and really challenges them as individuals.”

MSPA is the high school journalism organization in Mississippi. The association works with high school staffs all across the state in four areas – school newspapers, including online-only publications, print publications and news magazines; yearbooks, which almost every school has; broadcasts, which have doubled in the last two years; and awards and sessions for literary magazines for creative writing students.

“Our state convention offers skills workshops and education to help students better serve the communities in which they live and work,” Morgan said. “We also run a number of contests to honor and validate people in those four areas.”

The convention always offers basic interviewing, newswriting skills and yearbook design sessions. This year, they’ll also hold sessions on press rights and censorship in schools.

“We’re going to do a session on the current climate around media in our country, and the way we’ve been labeled, and how students can go about dealing with that,” Morgan said. “We have several different specialty sessions I’m excited about.”

Robby Donoho, a sports anchor from WCBI in Columbus, will lead several sessions.

“We really try to gather speakers in the industry and those who are teachers of journalism from across the state and beyond,” Morgan said. “I have a photographer coming from Forsyth County News in Atlanta. He is a photographer and also a content director for the non-daily newspaper, and student publications are essentially non-dailies. They might publish once a month if they are lucky. Usually, it’s more like twice or three times a semester, and so I think having the ability to hear some professional non-daily workflow information will be really neat.”

Morgan said they also try to bring in marketing speakers because the University of Mississippi has an integrated marketing communications program. They try to teach students how to market their publications and better develop their brand identity.

When MSPA started in 1947, Morgan said the convention was similar to a camp. The role of school publications has changed a lot in the past 70 years, and the convention has been a one-day event since the 1970s.

“We are one of the older scholastic press associations and one of the best attended scholastic press associations in the country,” said Morgan. This is his fourth year to direct the convention, and he said students teach him more than he teaches them regarding language evolution and technology.

“This generation – they are really innovative storytellers,” he said. “I don’t think they necessarily see themselves that way, but the way they communicate with themselves and their peers through social media and print – through broadcast, shorthand, longform – there are so many different ways they can communicate and get information to their audience. They really just amaze me.”

Morgan’s goal for every conference is to give students seeds of knowledge in new areas.

“When they get back to their schools,” he said, “it is then up to them, their communities and their teachers to foster the growth of those seeds, to the extent that we, in five and six hours, can open their mind to a new way of doing things, a better or more professional way of handling themselves, covering an event or telling a story.”

Morgan said he hopes the MPSA is a factor in the Meek School of Journalism and New Media’s growing enrollment. It is one of the fastest growing programs at UM.

“Anytime you can get 500 of the best and brightest high school students from the state on your campus, and on a campus as beautiful as this, they can’t help but take something away from it,” Morgan said. “Anytime you can get them in a facility interacting with professors that are as engaging and as interactive as ours, I don’t see how that doesn’t spark their attention.”

Morgan said the MSPA is not a recruiting arm, and they do not try to indoctrinate students about UM. They are a statewide organization focused on developing high school journalists.

“But a rising tide lifts all boats, and you can see the quality of students coming to Ole Miss begin to rise,” said Morgan who believes high school journalism is an important part of education in a media-saturated world.

“I talk to high school administrators all the time who have cut the school newspaper, or who have cut the journalism program from the school because there’s so much pressure at that level for state testing and core curriculum, etc.,” he said. “I had a school administrator tell me one time, ‘Yeah. We don’t do a school newspaper anymore because nobody reads those. Newspapers are kind of a dying thing.’

“And after I calmed down, I challenged his point of view, and I said, “So your position is that a student living in 2017 needs to know less about how media works and media literacy than they did in 1985? We are such a media society now. We are over-saturated with media, stimuli everywhere you look – on our phones, on our television screens, 24 hour news, Twitter, the barrage of bits of information that are coming to us all the time. So by teaching students journalism skills, by teaching them to be better thinkers, it also teaches them to be media consumers.”

If you plan on attending the convention or following it, the event hashtag is #MSPA17.

Contact R. J. Morgan for more information at morgan@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7146.

  • Story by LaReeca Rucker, adjunct journalism instructor

Dennis Moore to be honored with Ole Miss Silver Em

Posted on: March 19th, 2017 by ldrucker

Dennis Moore

Dennis Moore, whose career in journalism has led him back to Jackson as co-editor of Mississippi Today, has been tapped as this year’s Samuel Talbert Silver Em recipient by the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at Ole Miss.

The Silver Em presentation will take place during the Best of Meek dinner that begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, in the ballroom of the Inn at Ole Miss.

The award, named for an early department chairman and leader in journalism education, is the most prestigious journalism honor the university bestows. Moore is the 58th honoree in the recognition limited to native Mississippians or journalists who have spent a significant part of their careers in the state. Selection is based on careers exemplifying the highest ideals of American journalism.

Moore, who studied journalism at the University of Mississippi, began his reporting career at The Clarion-Ledger, but his experience started earlier at The Germantown News in Germantown, Tenn. “I made a blind call to the editor and asked if I could work there,” Moore said. “She said I was welcome to drop in on production nights, but they could not pay.” Moore went, worked and learned. More experience was gained through an internship with Southern Living.

In Jackson, Moore, a movie fan, was allowed an extra assignment to write one review per week. When Jackson landed the International Ballet Competition, Moore was assigned to provide coverage, gaining more exposure and experience to writing about the arts and entertainment. His success took him to The Orlando Sentinel to direct its arts coverage and edit the newspaper’s award-winning Sunday magazine, Florida.

USA Today was next, and Moore advanced to managing editor of the Life section. In that role he traveled and routinely met with celebrities, including forming a real admiration for Steven Spielberg and being nervous before talking with Mick Jagger. He was also pleased when John Grisham reported that his mother had appreciated a story Moore had written about the author. Moore lists his interview with Octavia Spencer, who won an Oscar for her work in “The Help” as his favorite actor interview.

Highlights in the Life years included attending the Oscars and an interview with his favorite actress, of Florida Magazine.

There was an abrupt change when Moore became breaking news editor for USA Today. In that role he guided the coverage of ebola in Africa and the United States, the violence and protests in Ferguson, Mo., the trial of a Boston Marathon bomber and the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” at the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma, Ala.

Moore was with USA Today during the development of its internet presence. In his newest position, he joined Fred Anklam, also a USA Today veteran, past Silver Em recipient and Ole Miss graduate, in launching an all-digital news service based in the state capital and devoted to nonpartisan reporting on Mississippi issues.

Moore called it a “true startup from creating a website to hiring reporters to introducing the new concept to readers.” Mississippi Today has seed grants from several national foundations with the purpose of informing the public about education, health, economic growth and culture.

For more information, contact the Meek School at meekschool@olemiss.edu.