The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

The University of Mississippi

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Berkley Hudson awarded 2015 Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence

Posted on: April 2nd, 2015 by ewrobins

Read the article at journalism.missouri.edu.

The Focus Group wins 39 Addy Awards

Posted on: April 1st, 2015 by ewrobins

Buchanan Addy Awards 2.15 croppedMembers of The Focus Group, an integrated marketing, advertising and PR firm in Gulfport, pose with the 39 Addy Awards they received after they swept the show at the Miss. Gulf Coast Advertising Federation’s “Totally Awesome Addys” 80’s-themed awards gala at the IP Casino Resort Spa in Biloxi. The Focus Group is led by Allison Brown Buchanan (B.A. Journalism/PR 1982). Among the 39 awards, they received gold Addys for Best of Show, Art Director of the Year, the Judges’ Choice Award, Best of Interactive, two integrated campaigns, two photography campaigns, two websites, an illustration campaign, a trade publication ad, a television spot :30, a digital advertising campaign and two brochures. The remaining awards were silver Addys for a variety of work ranging from copywriting and brochures, to digital campaigns, TV and illustration. The gold awards will automatically advance to the regional competition.

Left to right: Thomas Broadus, director of interactive and new media; Tara Gerald, lead graphic designer; Samantha McCain, PR and contentmanager; Jamie Gryder, accountant. (back row) William Colgin, photographer; Brenna Aplin, multimedia designer; Brynn Joachim, advertising operations manager; Allison Buchanan, general manager; Cecelia Shabazz, creative director; and Tyler Johnson, web developer.

Meek faculty recognized for online instruction

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by ewrobins
Robin Street

Robin Street

Deb Wenger

Deb Wenger

Deb Wenger, associate professor of journalism, is the winner of the 2014 Paragon Award for Excellence in Distance Learning Education. Her course JOUR 102 was selected as an exemplar of online instruction by the award committee.

Wenger will be honored at the ODeL Recognition Luncheon on April 15 at 12 p.m. at the Jackson Avenue Center.  The Paragon includes a $1,000 monetary award.

Additionally, Robin Street, lecturer in journalism, will receive an Honorable Mention for her course JOUR 391, which was rated as an extraordinary course by the committee.

Meek School Professor Joe Atkins publishes fiction novel

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by ewrobins

Joe Atkins croppedRead The Clarion-Ledger’s interview with Professor Joe Atkins about his new novel, “Casey’s Last Stand,” at clarionledger.com.

Innovation is focus of Ole Miss New Media 2015

Posted on: March 23rd, 2015 by drwenger

OMNMImageIt’s a rare business that doesn’t see the need to innovate, and the news and information industries have never needed to try new things more than they do now.

“Culture is the key word,” says Hank Price, general manager of WVTM-TV in Birmingham. “It’s very difficult to innovate; the more successful a company is at doing what they currently do, the more difficult it is for them to innovate.”

Price, who is one of the speakers at the Ole Miss New Media Conference (OMNM) on April 9 in The Overby Center Auditorium on the Oxford campus, says that companies often don’t think about innovation until it’s too late. He says media businesses have a tremendous opportunity right now.

“The door is open for anything we want to do,” Price said. “The consumer has never been more willing to accept fresh ideas. It’s a fantastic time to really look at how we can interact with the consumer in ways that are valuable and important.”

In addition to speaking at the conference, Price is one of the authors of a new book about news media management. Called “Managing Today’s Media: Audience First,” he wrote the book with Ole Miss journalism professors Deb Wenger and Samir Husni. It should be available in August of this year.

The OMNM Conference will kick off at 9:30 a.m. with remarks from Lewis D’Vorkin, Forbes Media’s chief product officer, a man responsible for the company’s digital and print platforms, including Forbes.com on desktop, mobile and tablets.

The conference will also feature USA TODAY’s Fred Anklam. Anklam is an Ole Miss graduate who will be receiving the Meek School of Journalism & New Media’s Silver Em Award. The award honors Mississippi journalists who have contributed a great deal to the profession.

Registration for the conference is now open. It costs $50 to attend and includes lunch in the Grove. Price hopes participants will come away understanding one important point.

“The fact is that you can’t innovate without failure. I don’t have any hard numbers, but I would guess looking at my own failure rate, I think it’s about 80 percent. The reality is you have to do a number of things wrong before you find your success.”

Former Mississippian editor G. Travis Stallworth dies at 77

Posted on: March 10th, 2015 by ewrobins

Travis StallworthGroves Travis Stallworth, Jr., a lifelong resident of Pascagoula and enthusiastic supporter of Gulf Coast sailing and Ole Miss sports, died Sunday, March 8. He was 77. Stallworth died at Singing River Hospital in Pascagoula after a short illness. The son of Groves Travis Stallworth and Dorothy Rigg Stallworth, he was born in Mobile Infirmary on July 19, 1937. He moved to Pascagoula as a child, where he attended Beach Elementary School and Pascagoula Junior High, and graduated from Pascagoula High School in 1955. He is preceded in death by his parents, and his only sister, Lynn Stallworth McIlwain.

Stallworth was Class of 1959 at the University of Mississippi, where he was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He was active in student journalism as sports editor and managing editor at The Mississippian before being elected Editor for 1958-59. He married Martha Elizabeth Rutledge, of Crenshaw, on February 14, 1960. Upon graduating from Ole Miss, he went into business with his father at Stallworth Furniture Company, now Stallworth Carpet and Drapery.

Despite constant and debilitating asthma, Stallworth was always a competitor. After taking up bowling in the early 1960s, when his team went to the state championship, he moved on to golf. He was President of Pascagoula Country Club and a founding member of Hickory Hills Country Club. A shelf full of bowling, golfing and sailing trophies was lost to Hurricane Katrina. Having grown up sailing a catboat, the Vagabond, on the Mississippi Sound, he returned to sailing in 1970 and soon joined the competitive seasons of the Gulf Yachting Association, the Gulf Coast Yachting Association, and the Gulf Ocean Racing Circuit.

He raced a succession of boats on the Mississippi Sound, the Gulf of Mexico, Lake Ponchartrain, Mobile Bay, Santa Rosa Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. His first boat was the Tonic, followed by Tonic Too, Gosh-a-Mighty, Witch of Scranton, Pride of Scranton, Renegade, Sweet Bippy, Wild Mouse, Honky Tonk Hero (green hull), Honky Tonk Hero (red hull), and Wild Cherry. Stallworth was a charter member of Singing River Yacht Club, and served as its third Commodore. He was a past member of Biloxi Yacht Club. He was Commodore and race committee chairman of the Gulf Coast Yachting Association. He also served as a Gulf Yachting Association handicapper and national board member for the Performance Handicap Racing Fleet.

Visitation will be Thursday, 12:00 noon-2:00 pm, at the First United Methodist Church in Pascagoula, followed immediately to begin at 2:00pm a Memorial Service at the church. A celebration of life will be held at Singing River Yacht Club following the church service. O’Bryant-O’Keefe Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; four daughters, Sharon Stallworth Nossiter of Dakar, Senegal, Lynn Stallworth of Boone, N.C., Kathryn Stallworth Ellis of Spanish Fort, Ala., and Virginia Stallworth of Memphis, Tenn.; two sons-in-law, Adam Nossiter and William Ellis; one daughter-in-law, Susan Mackenzie; six grandchildren, Travis and Jack Tucker, Franklin and Henry Nossiter, Elizabeth and Virginia Ellis; and longtime family friends Kevin and Cheryl Wall of Rome, Ga., and their children, Matthew and Cameron. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the H.E. “Gene” Peery Scholarship in Accountancy, c/o University of Mississippi Foundation, University, MS 38677. You may send your condolences to his family at www.obryantokeefe.com.

Defense expert explains terror threats to students

Posted on: March 9th, 2015 by ewrobins
Defense expert Van Hipp, right, has a conversation with Scott Coopwood at the Overby Center in the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. Photo by Timothy Ivy.

Defense expert Van Hipp, right, has a conversation with Scott Coopwood at the Overby Center in the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. Photo by Timothy Ivy

Van Hipp, chairman of American Defense International and a frequent media resource on terrorism, visited the Meek School of Journalism and New Media and shared highlights of his book, “The New Terrorism: How to Fight It and Defeat It.” The program was organized by Scott Coopwood, a friend of the school and publisher of a newspaper and magazines in Mississippi. Watch it at youtube.com.

2014-2015 Student Media managers: diverse, accomplished, driven to succeed

Posted on: March 4th, 2015 by ewrobins
Lacey Russel walks down the street in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. (DM Photo | Cady Herring)

Lacey Russell walks down the street in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. (DM Photo | Cady Herring)

Phillip Waller on the field at Vaught- Hemingway stadium on Oct. 4, 2014 on the campus of the University of Mississippi. (Phillip Waller | The Ole Miss)

Phillip Waller on the field at Vaught- Hemingway stadium on Oct. 4, 2014 on the campus of the University of Mississippi. (Phillip Waller | The Ole Miss)

Sudu Upadhyay

Sudu Upadhyay at Newswatch 99

Madelyn Mohr

Madelyn Mohr at Rebel Radio

Lacey Russell

Her first story made it into The Daily Mississippian, and then her second story made it on the front page, above the fold, and the rest, as Lacey Russell said, is history.

“I remember Instragramming my front page, and I thought maybe I have a knack for this,” said Russell, a junior journalism major from Tupelo.

“I had no idea it made the front page until somebody Tweeted at me. I was totally shocked, and I geeked out, and then I told my mom. That’s what confirmed that this is what I’m supposed to do — that feeling of gratification, knowing that all my hard work paid off.”

Russell was named editor-in-chief for the 2014-2015 school year.

“The selection committee was impressed with Lacey’s multiple platform experience, in print, TV and digital media,” said Patricia Thompson, student media director and adviser for The Daily Mississippian.

“Lacey had a tough act to follow, given the success of last year’s DM staff, but she has led her team to produce outstanding journalism — great in-depth articles, great design, great photography and great headlines.”

Some of the highlights from Russell’s tenure so far have included the front page after the football’s team victory over Alabama and a moving 10-year anniversary piece on the fire at the ATO fraternity house.

“People stop me on campus to tell me how much they have enjoyed reading The Daily Mississippian,” Thompson said.

Russell’s passion remains reporting and getting out in the field and getting to hear people’s stories and then telling their stories. She had an internship at WTVA-TV in Tupelo during winter break her sophomore year, and this year, she was one of 10 students selected to participate in a School of Journalism and New Media international journalism reporting course in Ethiopia during Winter Intersession.

Russell has faced her share of challenges as editor-in-chief. It has not only made her a stronger editor, writer and reporter, but also a stronger person.

“It’s hard to keep up with everything,” Russell said. “Being a 20-year-old college student and balancing class and also being responsible for a paper that’s circulating to thousands of people every day, it’s tough. People like to point the finger at the editor, and that used to bother me. I used to take it really personally. But I have really developed a thick skin through this job. Not much gets to me anymore.”

Russell has not made definite plans for her senior year and beyond, but she said she plans to remain involved in student media. She has applied for several summer internships. She also had some words to the wise.

“Get involved,” Russell said. “This is so essential for your career. You have to have experience. I know on my resume I have my experience before I have any of my education. It’s so important to do something and come out of college with work you have to show for it for your employers. And the SMC is a great place to get involved. There’s so much opportunity over here.”

She added: “There are going to be days where you don’t want to get out of bed and there are days where you will have stayed up until 5 a.m. working on the paper or working on your schoolwork, but hang in there and it will all be worth it one day.”

 

Phillip Waller

Phillip Waller is one of 10 outstanding seniors selected for the 2014-2015 Hall of Fame, one of the university’s highest honors.

Waller has worked as a photographer, editor and writer for The Daily Mississippian and The Ole Miss yearbook. This year, he is editor-in-chief of The Ole Miss.

A journalism and public policy leadership double-major in the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College, Waller traces his interest back to his aunt, Cynthia Ferguson, who used to be journalism instructor at Oxford High School, and before that, she worked for the Oxford Eagle.

“She got me interested in this idea that students could produce good work, and that the opportunities you have as a journalist are unmatched with any other profession,” Waller said.

His interest in journalism started with photography, growing up in a family where photography was something fun to do, something to relax, something to record a memory, and for him, it started with a simple point-and-shoot camera. He traces his serious work to the purchase of his first SLR camera, which he used all through high school.

“It starts with an interest, and then developing that interest, reinforcing that interest and then having a support group there,” Waller said. “My experience is not unique, but it’s something I’m blessed to have. I’m very thankful.”

Among his favorite things as a journalist, Waller said, are the opportunities for hands-on learning – experiencing events such as a sporting event or a theater production up close and personal with unmatched access. His work as a journalist has earned him a first-place Society of Journalists regional award for Best Non-Fiction Magazine Article, and first place in the On-Site News Photography Competition at the regional Southeast Journalism Conference.

“The student media center has reinforced the things I knew I already loved, and it allowed me to explore those with the resources and the capabilities that the center offers,” Waller said. “It has also provided me with a support group that can teach me skills and place me out there with opportunities that I wouldn’t have had otherwise.”

Student Media Director Patricia Thompson said that Waller has been a key player at the Student Media Center for several years. The Ole Miss annual has a reputation as one of the top yearbooks in the country, and this year’s book will continue that tradition, she said.

“Phillip is that rare person who excels as a writer as well as a visual journalist, so he was a perfect choice to be editor-in-chief of the yearbook,” Thompson said. “He’s active on campus, very plugged-in, and that has made a big difference. I have been particularly impressed with Phillip’s outreach and use of social media to broaden the awareness of the yearbook. He’s one of our top students academically, he’s a good manager, and he’s creative and full of ideas. That’s a great combination.”

As a student manager, Waller said his charge is not only to make the best publication, but also to pay it forward and help the next generation succeed.

“You want to make sure if you have a skill you know you spent a lot of time learning, that you make that skill that much easier for the next person to learn and give them that much higher of a position to start from for the next year,” Waller said. “When you have that talent pipeline in place, when you have people working to make sure the next generation is moving forward, then you can have an excellent publication.”

Looking to his future, Waller said he was drawn to journalism because of the strong communications education and training. He sees a career related to his two majors, perhaps in a political campaign capacity, adding that he has tried to remain flexible and keep his options open. Last summer, he had an internship in Washington, D.C., as a press intern in the office of Sen. Roger Wicker and as a digital intern at the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

“I’m definitely excited about the possibilities out there for me because I have been prepared for them here,” Waller said. “I have the flexibility and the skills, and I know how put myself out there because I have had this experience working in the Student Media Center. That’s going to serve me well in whatever I do.”

 

Sudu Upadhyay

Sudu Upadhyay is not one to settle. Whether it has been as a videographer assistant for Ole Miss athletics, sports anchor and reporter for Newswatch 99, or the station manager for the student-run TV show, Upadhyay strives to be the best.

Most freshmen aren’t ready to take on a leadership role, but Upadhyay proved himself to be the exception to the rule, excelling not only as an anchor and reporter, but also as the co-sports director on the way to becoming station manager as only a sophomore.

“Sudu doesn’t shoot for the ordinary,” said Nancy Dupont, faculty adviser for Newswatch. “He wants everything to be extraordinary. He’s not going to settle for anything.”

Upadhyay is a broadcast journalism major from Oxford, said was involved with athletics productions in high school.

“I met Stewart Pirani, then the (NewsWatch) student manager, when I was a senior in high school,” Upadhyay said. “I was shying away from student media. I was focusing more on the athletics production side, and he told me, if I really wanted to get into sports reporting, this was something I needed to check out.”

Upadhyay came in and shadowed for a few days and fell in love with the fast-moving news environment.

After winning two awards in a regional competition where he was pitted against students from universities across the Southeast United States, Upadhyay was offered a job by a television director in Louisiana, who was stunned when she found out he was just a freshman.

“If people are looking at me this way as a freshman, I can’t imagine what I could do being more involved, so that’s what made me get involved and stayed involved at Newswatch,” Upadhyay said.

Upadhyay was recently notified that his entry in the prestigious Hearst journalism competition placed in the Top 20 nationally. His entry included a four-part series from Togo, Africa, and a stand-up about the science of tornadoes – all of which aired on NewsWatch last spring, when he was a freshman.

“Someone that extraordinary needs an outlet very quickly,” Dupont said. “He wandered over here, and everybody saw what he could do, so they put him to work immediately.”

The highlight of his time so far as station manager, Upadhyay said, has been the Ole Miss-Alabama football game, which the Rebels went on to win 17-10 over the top-ranked Crimson Tide.

“The Alabama show was a focus from the beginning of the year,” Upadhyay said. “We said, if Ole Miss was undefeated going into the Alabama game, that was going to be our biggest show and that was what we are going to enter for an Emmy. That was the biggest show, and it went smoothly.

“After that, I got burned out, but then I thought, ‘We had one good show. Now, we have to follow it up. We can’t be a one-trick pony with one great show and then fall off.’ We already had a spectacular show. If people saw that, they need to see that same standard or a higher standard of Newswatch every day, so that’s what keeps me going and keeps me trying to make better shows.”

One of the changes the hard-working NewsWatch staff has made this year is the addition of frequent live feeds.

Looking ahead to next year, Upadhyay plans to work as an anchor and reporter for Newswatch, and pursue other opportunities for professional and campus internships.

 

Madelyn Mohr

Madelyn Mohr, a senior accountancy major from Houston, Texas, rose through the ranks at Rebel Radio, from “DJ Mad Dog,” to production director, to station manager. She loved music, so she followed her passion.

“Since I have been able to stand, I have liked to sing,” Mohr said. “Classic rock is my favorite genre, and I remember my dad was always playing that. In middle school, I played the French horn in band for four or five years, and then I started playing the guitar and singing in restaurants. I got into music, and I loved that, and Rebel Radio made sense, so I pursued it.”

As the station manager for the 2014-2015 academic year, Madelyn oversees a staff of more than 30 students.

Rebel Radio is one of only a handful of college student-run commercial FM radio stations in the country. The station broadcasts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and boasts a signal stretching nearly 40 miles across North Mississippi.

“It’s the hidden gem of the SMC,” Mohr said. “If you love classic rock music, you can apply as a DJ and do your own classic rock segment. If you want to get involved with production work or get involved with businesses, you can do that too. You can also program music into the system and work with the Adobe Audition program to create commercials. If you want to work in the radio industry, you can get a lot of hands-on experience here.”

Her experience at Rebel Radio, Mohr said, has helped her see not just radio, but the entire music industry. As part of her accountancy degree program, she is currently in Houston as an intern with Ernst and Young.

Mohr is interested in pursuing a master’s degree in music business and then a career as a general manager of a radio station, or something along those lines.

Rebel Radio adviser Roy Frostenson said that Mohr’s internship in January and February allows her to successfully combine her accounting and music backgrounds.

“That is an example of how her love for music, nurtured by the SMC and Rebel Radio, is shaping her career choices,” Frostenson said.

Whether you’re an incoming student or a current student, a journalism major or a non-journalism major, Mohr made a pitch for Rebel Radio and the Student Media Center.

“If you love music, this is the place on campus to go,” Mohr said. “No other place on campus is going to let you plug in your computer or your phone and have your own playlist and play what you want and talk about the artists or festivals in the music industry.”

USA Today editor honored with Silver Em

Posted on: March 3rd, 2015 by ewrobins

Fred Anklam Jr. worked on landmark series examining Mississippi schools, covered U.S. House for national paper

Fred Anklam

Fred Anklam in the USA TODAY newsroom. Photo by Jud McCrehin

Fred Anklam Jr. (’77), a senior editor at USA Today, has been chosen to receive the 2015 Sam Talbert Silver Em Award from the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media.

The award will be presented at a dinner April 8 at the Inn at Ole Miss, starting at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25 and are available by contacting Paula Hurdle at 662-915-7146 or pchurdle@olemiss.edu.

The school’s highest honor in journalism, the award dates to 1958. Recipients must be Mississippians with notable journalism careers or journalists with notable careers in Mississippi – or both, which is the case with Anklam.

Though born in Kentucky where his father was an Army officer, Anklam spent his formative years in Vicksburg, where he graduated from St. Aloysius High School in 1972. After a year at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, he completed his college degree in journalism, with minors in anthropology and English, at UM. He was a staffer of The Daily Mississippian student newspaper and a member of Sigma Delta Chi, and the Society of Professional Journalists.

For six years after graduation, Anklam was a reporter for The Jackson (Miss.) Clarion-Ledger where, as part of a team in 1982, he worked on a six-month investigation of Mississippi schools and a related special legislative session that led to a Pulitzer Prize.

“Of all the students we’ve had in journalism, he’s one I am so impressed with because of how humble he is. He didn’t let success go to his head,” said Will Norton Jr., dean of the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. “He uses his reporting ability for the betterment of his community.”

Anklam has many additional awards, including a 1981 first place from the Education Writers Association for investigative reporting on unsafe schools. Two more awards came from that group in 1982, followed by a Roy W Howard Public Service Award in 1983.

His career with Gannett News Service and, later, USA Today, began in Washington. In 1986, he was the first USA Today reporter assigned full time to cover the U.S. House. Starting in 1988, Anklam was tapped as an editor for the national newspaper. He has had roles as night national news editor, White House editor, news/international editor, news/chief operations editor and news editor.

Those roles led to his current position, where he supervises USA Today coverage at night and during the early morning hours, oversees production of the domestic editions and local inserted editions as well as the Tropics edition. He serves as backup to the Page 1 editor and directs coverage on all USA Today platforms, digital and print.

Charles Overby was executive editor of The Clarion Ledger when the Pulitzer was won. He was later a top executive for the newspaper’s parent company, Gannett, before being named CEO and chairman of the Freedom Forum.

“Fred has this great ability to be a nice guy, but a tough reporter,” Overby said. “He knows the right question to ask.”

Anklam’s spouse, Cissy Foote Anklam, is an independent museum consultant and is also an Ole Miss graduate. They have three adult children.

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media was founded in 2009, funded with an endowment gift by Ed and Becky Meek. It offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in both journalism and integrated marketing communications on the Oxford campus and in coordination with satellite campuses. Because of the increasing variety of media careers, enrollment continues to rise in the Meek School, which has nearly 1,200 undergraduate journalism and IMC majors.

PREVIOUS SILVER EM HONOREES

1958 – George W. Healy Jr.

1959 – Turner Catledge

1960 – Kenneth Toler

1961 – John Oliver Emmerich

1963 – George McLean

1964 – William B. Street

1965 – Purser Hewitt

1966 – Hal C. DeCell

1967 – Paul Pittman

1968 – Hodding Carter Jr.

1969 – Willie Morris

1970 – T.M. Hederman Jr.

1971 – Joseph R. Ellis

1972 – Wilson F. Minor

1973 – Mark F. Ethridge

1975 – H.L. Stevenson

1976 – William Raspberry

1977 – Joe L. Albritton

1978 – James A. Autry

1979 – James Nelson

1980 – Mary-Lynn Kotz

1981 – Curtis Wilkie

1982 – Harold Burson

1983 – John O. Emmerich

1984 – Hazel Brannon Smith

1985 – Charles Overby

1986 – W.C. “Dub” Shoemaker

1987 – Charles Dunagin, Larry Speakes

1988 – Edward Fritts

1989 – Rudy Abramson

1990 – Hodding Carter III

1991 – James L. McDowell

1992 – Rheta Grimsley Johnson

1993 – Dan Goodgame

1994 – Robert Gordon

1995 – Jere Hoar

1996 – Gregory Favre

1997 – Stephanie Saul

1998 – Lerone Bennett

2000 – Jerry Mitchell

2001 – Bert Case

2002 – Ira Harkey

2003 – Jim Abbott

2005 – Otis Sanford

2006 – Dan Phillips

2007 – Stanley Dearman

2008 – Ronnie Agnew

2009 – Stan Tiner

2010 – Terry Wooten

2011 – Patsy Brumfield

2012 – Greg Brock

2013 – W. Randall Pinkston

2014 – Fred Anklam Jr.

Meek School students named SEJC champions

Posted on: March 2nd, 2015 by ewrobins
Photo by Cady Herring, Daily Mississippian Photo Editor

Photo illustration by Cady Herring, Daily Mississippian Photo Editor

University of Mississippi students won 26 awards in the annual Southeast Journalism Conference, and for the fourth time in five years, they were honored as the first-place Onsite Championship Team.

This year’s conference was hosted by Georgia State University from Feb. 26-28 in Atlanta. Two separate awards ceremonies were held: Best of the South, which honors student work published or broadcast from November 2013 through November 2014, and onsite competitions where students compete on deadline in 17 different categories.

Sudu Upadhyay and Cady Herring – both sophomores – each won two first-place awards. Herring, who is Daily Mississippian Photo Editor, was named Best Press Photographer in the Best of the South contest, and won first place in the onsite news photography contest. Upadhyay, who is NewsWatch Station Manager, was named Best Television Journalist in Best of the South contest, and he and senior NewsWatch anchor Gabriel Austin won first place in the onsite Television Reporting team category.

Other first-place winners were:

  • Ellen Whitaker, first place in the onsite page layout competition. Whitaker is a DM Design Editor.
  • Sierra Mannie, first place in the onsite op-ed writing competition. Mannie is DM Opinion Editor. Read the column at theDMonline.com.
  • Adam Ganucheau, first place for Best Special Event Reporer/Editor in Best of the South. Ganucheau broke the news in February 2014 that the James Meredith statute on campus was found draped with a noose and a flag with Confederate symbols, and the award was for his news coverage as well as editorials and enterprise, including an interview with James Meredith in Jackson. This is the second year in a row that Ganucheau won first place in this category. Ganucheau is former Daily Mississippian Editor-in-Chief. He graduated last May, and is working as a reporter for AL.com in Birmingham.

Other students who won awards were:

  • Clara Turnage, second place for Best Feature Writer in Best of the South. Turnage is DM Lifestyles Editor.
  • Sarah Parrish, second place in the copy editing onsite competition. Parrish is DM Managing Editor.
  • Shawna Mackenzie Hicks, second place in the onsite media ethics competition. Hicks is DM Copy Chief.
  • Payton Green, second place in the onsite current events competition. Green is NewsWatch News Director.
  • Miriam Cresswell, second place for Best Journalism Research Paper. Her paper was titled “The Disappearance of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner and the Media’s Response,” and she wrote it for “The Press and The Changing South” class taught by Dr. Kathleen Wickham. Creswell, former NewsWatch Station Manager, graduated last May, and is working as a producer at WAAY-TV in Huntsville.
  • Lacey Russell, third place for Best News Writer in Best of the South, and honorable mention in the onsite feature writing competition. Russell is DM Editor-in-Chief.
  • Dylan Rubino, third place for Best Sports Writer in Best of the South. Rubino is DM Sports Editor.
  • Allison Moore, third place for Best Newspaper Page Layout Designer in Best of the South. Moore is a DM Design Editor.
  • Ian Cleary, fourth place for Best News-Editorial Artist-Illustrator. Cleary is DM cartoonist.
  • Gabriel Austin, fourth place for Best TV Hard News Reporter in Best of the South. Austin is a NewsWatch anchor.
  • Amy Hornsby, sixth place for Best Advertising Staff Member in Best of the South. Hornsby is Rebel Radio Interim Station Manager.
  • Browning Stubbs, sixth place for Best Multimedia Journalist. Stubbs is NewsWatch Sports Director, DM basketball beat writer, and a Rebel Radio sports DJ.
  • Kendyl Noon, ninth place for Best TV News Feature Reporter. Noon is a NewsWatch anchor and DM Online Editor.

NewsWatch Ch. 99 won third place for Best College Video News Program, and fourth place for Best College TV Station. The Daily Mississippian won sixth place for Best College Newspaper, and was the only daily newspaper honored. TheDMonline.com won tenth place as Best College Website.

Best of the South had 523 entries from 33 universities. About 200 students from across the southeast competed in the onsite competitions.

More than 45 universities in seven states are members of SEJC. The 2016 conference will be at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee. In 2017, the conference will be here at the University of Mississippi.