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Archive for the ‘Featured News’ Category

“Mississippi Votes: Looking Back, Moving Forward” Documentary

Posted on: November 29th, 2016 by jheo1

“Mississippi Votes: Looking Back, Moving Forward,” a documentary project of two reporting classes at the Meek School of Journalism & New Media, will debut at 1:00 p.m. December 1 in the Overby Center auditorium. The half-hour documentary looks at the recent 2016 elections from a Mississippi perspective, focusing especially on the key topics of immigration, voter ID and millennials.

The documentary is a combined project of JOUR 578 and JOUR 377 under the direction of Dr. Brad Schultz and Dr. Kathleen Wickham. Their students spent the semester interviewing dozens of figures around the state both before and after election night.

For more information, you can contact Dr. Schultz (bschultz@olemiss.edu) or Dr. Wickham (kwickham@olemiss.edu). There is a multitude of other in-depth stories available at:
http://election2016.olemiss.edu/

Careers in Non-Profit Communications

Posted on: November 29th, 2016 by jheo1

Four alumnae of Meek School classes spoke on a panel about their careers in non-profit communication to the PR Case Studies class taught by Robin Street on Nov. 3.

Pictured, left to right, are: (front row) Kate Rosson, communications manager for staff and volunteers with The American Cancer Society Global Headquarters; Laura Doty, marketing and communications manager for the Memphis Zoo; Susan Christensen, PR director for the Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson, Miss.; (back row) Street; and Jane Lloyd Brown, liaison for strategic partnerships at ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

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The women presented examples of projects they have worked on, then talked generally about their jobs. In the final portion, they answered questions from students on topics ranging from what salary they make to what challenges they have faced and what career advice they could offer.

Brown, Rosson and Doty are all Street’s former students. Rosson and Christensen have B.A. degrees in journalism. Rosson also has a master’s degree from Ole Miss in leadership in higher education. Brown and Doty hold B.B.A. degrees in marketing communications. Doty also has a master’s degree in advertising and public relations from the University of Alabama.

Election Eve Visit Brings Back Memories of Ole Miss Presidential Debate

Posted on: November 7th, 2016 by drwenger
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The executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates, Janet Brown, and former Ole Miss Chancellor Robert Khayat signed two of the debate banners that were flown on campus prior to the 2008 debate in Oxford.

Janet Brown, long-time executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates returned to the Ole Miss campus on November 7 to talk about one of the most exciting and challenging election seasons in American history. Brown shared her views on the importance of the debates to the democratic process and described how other countries are watching and learning from the U.S. political debate example.

Her visit also provided a chance for her to reconnect with former Ole Miss Chancellor Robert Khayat, who led the university’s successful bid to bring one of the 2008 debates to the Oxford campus.

The luncheon at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism & Politics brought together a number of faculty and distinguished visitors, including Susan Spencer of CBS and her husband Tom Oliphant, late of the Boston Globe and PBS News Hour.

Meek Prof Becomes First to Achieve Academic Honor at UK University

Posted on: November 7th, 2016 by drwenger

dr-wenger-web-5-meeksiteA love of learning and a willingness to try new things are two key characteristics of Dr. Debora Wenger’s approach to her life and career. For that reason, it didn’t come as a big surprise to the dean of the Meek School of Journalism & New Media when Wenger asked about getting her doctorate in journalism at Kingston University in London.

“Absolutely,” Norton said. “The European doctorate includes an option for PhD by Publication, enabling you to integrate your existing published scholarship and produce an accompanying dissertation that will both itemize your contribution – and probably set your research agenda for the rest of your career. This is truly important for the Meek School.”

Dr. David Rogers, formerly Head of the School of Humanities at Kingston University and now Director of the Kingston Writing School, first invited Wenger to consider applying for a PhD by Publication during a visit to Mississippi as part of his efforts to initiate the study abroad link that now exists between the two universities and to discuss ways in which their respective journalism departments might collaborate. Wenger made her application to Kingston’s doctoral program in early 2015 and will be officially awarded the Department of Journalism and Publishing’s first ever PhD by Publication in January 2017. According to the Kingston website, the degree recognizes applicants who have “undertaken and produced research, and developed their research skills and subject knowledge to doctoral level.”

Dr. Alison Baverstock, the chair of Wenger’s PhD committee, says that the scholarly validation of work that has a relevance to both the workplace and the academy, through PhD by Publication, has a particular significance.

“For profession-oriented disciplines such as journalism, and in my case publishing, the combination we offer students of professional practice at the highest level, along with academic thinking, is the ideal basis for seeking employment,” said Baverstock. “We teach students key practical skills that they can put into use immediately, but also develop their ability to think and plan – leaving them able to function in their chosen industry now, but also in future to work around, and hopefully solve, problems in the workplace that we don’t even yet anticipate.”

Dr Rogers adds that “it was a great pleasure to have the chance to work with Dr. Wenger and to learn more about her research. Like the University of Mississippi, Kingston University takes pride in its commitment to degree programs that combine traditional academic analysis with practice and professional-based skills. Having such a respected and widely published academic journalist such as Dr. Wenger, whose research focuses on the vital interface between the academy and industry necessary for pertinent curriculum development, choose to complete her PhD with us not only testifies to that shared commitment but also validates the PhD by Publication degree as a way to enhance it.”

Wenger, herself, found the process both challenging and rewarding.

“Getting a doctorate has allowed me to reflect on the nature and importance of scholarship,” said Wenger. “The process has made me more enthusiastic than ever about pursuing the answers to questions that are relevant to the profession and the academy.

Wenger’s thesis focused on the intersection between professional practice and university teaching. Her external examiner was Prof. Chris Frost, former head of the Association for Journalism Education in the UK and current director of the Centre for Responsible Journalism at Liverpool John Moores University. The internal examiner for Kingston was Prof. Normal Clarke, a widely published author on the faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.  Baverstock, who co-founded the graduate publishing program at Kingston, said their evaluation of Wenger’s thesis is significant in adding validation of work that spans both the profession and the academy.

“Its complete acceptance – meaning no changes required at all, which is very unusual in the UK – confirms not only the influence she exercises in both her profession and her institution, but also the role model offers her students – in being willing to subject her work to scrutiny, and stand up for what she believes. We also think it’s highly significant that her work has been validated in the UK, and covers research carried out within the US and Europe; truly summing up the international contribution she has made.”

Wenger will attend Kingston’s graduation ceremony in January and says she will likely be thinking during the ceremony about something Baverstock once wrote to her in an email.

“Aged 87 Michelangelo wrote on a piece of work ‘Ancora imparo’ – which translates as ‘I am still learning’. It’s always good for students to see that their professors are learning too.”

 

Recent Graduate Clancy Smith Returns to The Meek School Shares Insights into Career in Government Relations

Posted on: November 1st, 2016 by jheo1

Communicating is hard enough. But try communicating on behalf of 122 different personalities.

That’s the situation facing Clancy Smith, a 2015 graduate of The Meek School of Journalism and New Media, in her new job as House Information Officer for the 122- member Mississippi House of Representatives.

Smith returned to campus Oct. 20 to speak on working in government communications to the Public Relations Case Studies class taught by her former instructor Robin Street.

 “Clancy is one the best students I have ever taught,” Street said.  “She excels in journalism and communication skills. The Mississippi Legislature is lucky to have someone with her talents.”

 Smith, who was a print journalism major with a PR emphasis, uses her journalism degree daily in her job. She may take a photo and send it to a representative’s local newspaper, write a news article, or compile a digital newsletter for the internal public of representatives.

“Not a day goes by that I don’t make use of the writing and communications skills I acquired at Ole Miss,” Smith said. “Applying those skills in my role as House Information Officer allows me to be more confident and effective in my job.” 

She provides information to members of the Capitol Press Corps, responds to local news outlets on matters relating to legislation, sets up news conferences for representatives and writes weekly summaries of legislative proceedings.

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Clancy Smith (left), a 2015 graduate of The Meek School, returned to campus to speak to Senior Lecturer Robin Street’s (right) public relations class about her job as House Information Officer for the Mississippi House of Representatives. Photo by Taylor Lewis.

By Taylor Lewis

The Honorable Delbert Hoseman, Mississippi’s Secretary of State, talks to students in a Meek School journalism class.

Posted on: October 31st, 2016 by jheo1

Posted on: October 29th, 2016 by jheo1

Berkley Hudson and his brother at the Meek School tent before the Auburn game.

Assistant Professor Mikki Harris in Beijing, China

Posted on: October 28th, 2016 by jheo1

Assistant Professor Mikki Harris and Nosa Egiebor, Senior International Officer and Professor of Chemical Engineering, traveled to Beijing to present “Strategy for Global Engagement at the University of Mississippi” during North China University of Technology’s 70th anniversary celebration. Harris discussed how the Meek School of Journalism uses visual storytelling as a way to develop students, the Meek School and communities through global experiential learning.

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UM Journalism Professor Presents Katrina Archive Work at UCLA

Posted on: October 19th, 2016 by jheo1

A professor at the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media will present her work to discover and republish an archive of lost blogs, emails and other online writing from the years after Hurricane Katrina on Friday (Oct. 14) at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Cynthia Joyce is editor of “Please Forward: How blogging reconnected New Orleans after Katrina,” an anthology released Aug. 29, 2015, the 10th anniversary of the storm. The anthology mined blog posts and widely circulated emails from more than 75 blogs and online websites, many of which are no longer live. It weaves an intimate narrative of the first two years after the storm and the lives of the people who lived through it.

cynthiajoyce2-768x431“The contributors to this anthology were so generous in allowing us to resurface their reflections from such a difficult part of their lives,” Joyce said. “We pulled those up and put them into print.

“Those posts – and the original blogs they were excerpted from – also deserve to be discoverable in an online context. Working with Archive-It made that possible.”

Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall on Aug. 29, 2005 near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line, killed 1,833 people in five states, including 231 in Mississippi. It’s often referred to as the most destructive natural disaster in U.S. history.

Joyce is participating in the “Dodging the Memory Hole: Saving Online News” forum at UCLA’s Young Research Library, hosted by Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri. She is part of the lightning round of participants, in which each panelist has three minutes to deliver their message.

Will Norton, dean of the Meek School, said Joyce’s colleagues are proud of her work.

“Cynthia Joyce is a first-rate journalist who brings years of work at the cutting edge of new media to her presentation at UCLA,” Norton said. “It says a lot about the Meek School that our faculty members are making presentations at prestigious institutions with other pioneering innovators.”

Joyce and the others involved in the anthology project used Archive-It, a web archiving service of Internet Archive used by more than 450 libraries, archives, universities, governments and researchers to collect, preserve and provide ongoing access to cultural heritage materials published on the web.

The anthology, which was published by University of New Orleans Press, will also be accessible and searchable online via the Internet Archive’s Archive-It database later this year. Jefferson Bailey, director of web archiving at Internet Archive/Archive-It, is also presenting at the conference.

“The web is the most significant publishing platform of our era, democratizing the ability to document our lives and communities for a global audience,” Bailey said. “Yet content on the web is highly ephemeral, often eluding the traditional process of historical preservation.

“We are excited to be able to collaborate with researchers like Cynthia Joyce, who bring local expertise and community knowledge, and work together to identify, archive and provide access to these historically valuable resources so that they remain available long into the future.”

ESPN Campus Connection

Posted on: October 14th, 2016 by jheo1

Meek School student worked with the ESPNU crew as part of the volleyball broadcast October 9 on the ESPNU Campus Connection broadcast at Ole Miss.

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